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Appears in:
Page: 4364 (abstract only)
Publication year: 2012
ISBN: 978-84-695-3491-5
ISSN: 2340-1117

Conference name: 4th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 2-4 July, 2012
Location: Barcelona, Spain

INDUCTION IN GERMANY – TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING? A COMPARATIVE APPROACH TO THE BAVARIAN REFERENDARIAT IN THE EUROPEAN CONTEXT

K. Zaki1, H. Lindner2

1University of Regensburg (GERMANY)
2St. Marien-Gymnasium Regensburg (GERMANY)
Although the expectations NQTs have and the problems they encounter are universal or at least very similar across national borders, young teachers between Helsinki and Sevilla are by no means trained and supported in a similar way – not during their university studies and even less at the start of their working careers (here referred to as induction). Looking at the heterogeneous values and ways of induction in Europe, we conceive very diverse approaches, ranging from liberal laissez faire practices to highly regulated induction systems.

Whereas many Scandinavian countries place close to the beginning, for example, the German (Bavarian) “Referendariat” can be seen at the far end of the scale. Structures and procedures are legally codified ( BayLBG/Law of teacher Education in Bavaria and in the ZALG/Legal regulations for the education and training of NQTs in Bavaria), establishing an induction period of 24 months with several assessment procedures and examinations to be passed before newly qualified teachers can work as independent professionals.1 In order to evaluate the structures, procedures and conventions of the traditional Referendariat, special attention is paid to NQTs own perspectives, identified learning needs and perceived problems. Thus, the analysis of specific strenghts and weaknesses of the Bavarian “Referendariat” is based on the qualitative research realized in Bavarian induction schools between 2009 and 2011.

In a second step, a comparison of the Referendariat and more liberal European induction systems promises to be interesting, not only to consider the advantages and disadvantages of both, but also and especially to see if and how an exchange of ideas and practices can be fruitful and beneficial to all sides involved. Taking into account structural aspects, public perceptions and measurable consequences of the different systems, our guiding question is: How many rules would we need and how much laissez-faire could we enjoy – in Bavaria as well as in Europe’s induction systems in general – to support without pressure and guide without orders?
@InProceedings{ZAKI2012IND,
author = {Zaki, K. and Lindner, H.},
title = {INDUCTION IN GERMANY – TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING? A COMPARATIVE APPROACH TO THE BAVARIAN REFERENDARIAT IN THE EUROPEAN CONTEXT},
series = {4th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN12 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-695-3491-5},
issn = {2340-1117},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {2-4 July, 2012},
year = {2012},
pages = {4364}}
TY - CONF
AU - K. Zaki AU - H. Lindner
TI - INDUCTION IN GERMANY – TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING? A COMPARATIVE APPROACH TO THE BAVARIAN REFERENDARIAT IN THE EUROPEAN CONTEXT
SN - 978-84-695-3491-5/2340-1117
PY - 2012
Y1 - 2-4 July, 2012
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 4th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN12 Proceedings
SP - 4364
EP - 4364
ER -
K. Zaki, H. Lindner (2012) INDUCTION IN GERMANY – TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING? A COMPARATIVE APPROACH TO THE BAVARIAN REFERENDARIAT IN THE EUROPEAN CONTEXT, EDULEARN12 Proceedings, p. 4364.
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