About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 1257-1263
Publication year: 2010
ISBN: 978-84-613-9386-2
ISSN: 2340-1117

Conference name: 2nd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 5-7 July, 2010
Location: Barcelona, Spain

TEACHING DISCIPLINARY HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS AUGMENTS META-COGNITION IN HEALTH SCIENCES EDUCATION

A. Weber

Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (QATAR)
Many international medical schools offer medical history courses as a humanities component as a pleasant diversion from the hard sciences, as a means of creating educational depth and preparation for good citizenship, or to develop writing, communication and critical / analytical thinking skills. Medical history, however, has another serious role to play in research and clinical practice by developing medical learners who can engage in creative, evidence-based problem-solving (medical diagnosis, prognosis, biomedical research, and translational science). An understanding of historical disease models and philosophies of the body and illness promotes meta-cognitive thinking skills, more popularly known as ‘big picture thinking.’ For example, modern medicine may be in the midst of a Kuhnian paradigm shift from the late 19th century germ theory of disease to a new genetic model of etiology. The prominence given to Stem Cell Research, genomics, and gene therapy in current biomedical science is drawing funding from traditional efforts in public health, development of new antibiotics and vaccines, and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). The realization, developed through the historical analysis of the foundations of the health sciences, that historically different models of disease have existed and still exist at the present time, is a powerful cognitive tool for students in developing and weighing alternative new therapies or non-mainstream therapeutics such as complementary / alternative medicine. The concept learned from history that entire disease models have been abandoned and been replaced by competing models, and that progress in science does simply result from the accumulation of individual facts, encourages serendipity and ‘break-through’ scientific modalities. Drawing on the author’s history of medicine courses taught at Cornell University and Weill Cornell Medical College – Qatar, this contribution explores the benefits of teaching medical history in developing critical, analytical and meta-cognitive thinking skills among medical and premedical students.
@InProceedings{WEBER2010TEA,
author = {Weber, A.},
title = {TEACHING DISCIPLINARY HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS AUGMENTS META-COGNITION IN HEALTH SCIENCES EDUCATION},
series = {2nd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN10 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-613-9386-2},
issn = {2340-1117},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {5-7 July, 2010},
year = {2010},
pages = {1257-1263}}
TY - CONF
AU - A. Weber
TI - TEACHING DISCIPLINARY HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS AUGMENTS META-COGNITION IN HEALTH SCIENCES EDUCATION
SN - 978-84-613-9386-2/2340-1117
PY - 2010
Y1 - 5-7 July, 2010
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 2nd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN10 Proceedings
SP - 1257
EP - 1263
ER -
A. Weber (2010) TEACHING DISCIPLINARY HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS AUGMENTS META-COGNITION IN HEALTH SCIENCES EDUCATION, EDULEARN10 Proceedings, pp. 1257-1263.
User:
Pass: