About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 7439-7443
Publication year: 2016
ISBN: 978-84-608-5617-7
ISSN: 2340-1079
doi: 10.21125/inted.2016.0759

Conference name: 10th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
Dates: 7-9 March, 2016
Location: Valencia, Spain

LINKS BETWEEN STRESS COPING SKILLS AND CONTINGENCIES OF SELF-WORTH IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

A. Vaiciuliene, A. Ivanauskas

Lithuanian University of Educational Sciences (LITHUANIA)
In different stages of human development individual’s self-esteem depends on different things. At one time, such areas as physical appearance, effectiveness of body functioning, and interpersonal relationships occupy a central place, at another - academic competence, success in professional activities, and so on. There are individual differences also. For example, for some people self-esteem may depend on being physically attractive, for others self-esteem may depend on being virtuous. If an individual's self-esteem is strongly contingent, it may come at a high stress and psychological vulnerability (Crocker, & Luhtanen, 2003). The current study aims to examine stress coping skills concerning different contingencies on which students of Lithuanian University of Educational Sciences base their self-esteem. The study was based on the idea that some kinds of contingencies of self-worth enforce more or less effective stress coping strategies. The Contingencies of Self-Worth Scale (Crocker et al., 2003) was applied for assessing seven contingencies on which individuals base their self-esteem. The authors identified seven domains which contribute to individual’s global self-esteem: approval from others, appearance, competition, academic competence, family support, virtue, and God’s love. Appearance, competition, and approval from others are the most external contingencies of self-worth. They have high costs for stress. Family support is also external but stable enough source of self-esteem. Virtue and God’s love are internal and relatively stable sources of self-esteem. Academic competence is associated with internal but more strongly with external contingencies (Crocker, 2002). The Coping with Stress Questionnaire (Grakauskas, & Valickas, 2006) was applied for measuring stress coping strategies (social support, problem solving, emotional discharge, and avoidance) in the current study. The results show associations between contingencies of self-worth and stress coping strategies among university students. It was found that some contingencies of self-worth lead to a better prediction of appropriate stress coping strategies. Although dependent self-esteem may cause high levels of stress, nonetheless dependency on academic competence and virtue predict effective stress coping strategy - problem solving. Family support allowed prediction of also effective stress coping strategy - social support. Only dependency on religious faith predicts less effective stress coping strategies such as emotional discharge and avoidance.
@InProceedings{VAICIULIENE2016LIN,
author = {Vaiciuliene, A. and Ivanauskas, A.},
title = {LINKS BETWEEN STRESS COPING SKILLS AND CONTINGENCIES OF SELF-WORTH IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS},
series = {10th International Technology, Education and Development Conference},
booktitle = {INTED2016 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-608-5617-7},
issn = {2340-1079},
doi = {10.21125/inted.2016.0759},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/inted.2016.0759},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Valencia, Spain},
month = {7-9 March, 2016},
year = {2016},
pages = {7439-7443}}
TY - CONF
AU - A. Vaiciuliene AU - A. Ivanauskas
TI - LINKS BETWEEN STRESS COPING SKILLS AND CONTINGENCIES OF SELF-WORTH IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
SN - 978-84-608-5617-7/2340-1079
DO - 10.21125/inted.2016.0759
PY - 2016
Y1 - 7-9 March, 2016
CI - Valencia, Spain
JO - 10th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
JA - INTED2016 Proceedings
SP - 7439
EP - 7443
ER -
A. Vaiciuliene, A. Ivanauskas (2016) LINKS BETWEEN STRESS COPING SKILLS AND CONTINGENCIES OF SELF-WORTH IN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS, INTED2016 Proceedings, pp. 7439-7443.
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