About this paper

Appears in:
Page: 6867 (abstract only)
Publication year: 2017
ISBN: 978-84-697-6957-7
ISSN: 2340-1095
doi: 10.21125/iceri.2017.1799

Conference name: 10th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
Dates: 16-18 November, 2017
Location: Seville, Spain

CONTRIBUTION OF SCIENCE TEACHERS’ EFFICACY BELIEFS TO THEIR EMOTIONS

E. Uzuntiryaki-Kondakci1, Z.D. Kirbulut2, O. Oktay3, E. Sarici1

1Middle East Technical University (TURKEY)
2Harran University (TURKEY)
3Ataturk University (TURKEY)
Teaching is a complex activity which involves many variables. Among these variables, teacher emotions are an integral part of instruction. Teachers experience a range of positive and negative emotions in the instruction process. While emotions like happiness, satisfaction, and enjoyment are positive emotions, frustration, anger, or boredom are perceived as negative. Teacher emotions influence their cognition and motivation as well as the quality of their instruction. Therefore, it is necessary to examine their emotions and the factors that may play role in their emotions regarding teaching. Teacher efficacy which is based on social cognitive theory, in this respect, might be related to teacher emotions. Teachers’ beliefs about their capability to promote student learning may account for their positive and negative emotions. For example, teachers with low self-efficacy may develop anxiety, which in turn negatively influence their teaching. As a result, the purpose of the present study was to investigate how well teacher efficacy predicts teacher emotions. This was a correlational study with 369 science teachers in different public middle schools. Data were collected using Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) and Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale. Two separate stepwise multiple linear analyses were performed taking teacher emotion variables (positive and negative emotions) as dependent variables and teacher efficacy variables (teacher efficacy in student engagement, instructional strategies, and classroom management) as predictor variables. For positive emotions, results indicated that the model explained 14.7% of variance. Teacher efficacy in student engagement (B = .163, p < .05) and instructional strategies (B = .251, p < .05) were significant predictors of teachers’ positive emotions. For negative emotions, only teacher efficacy in instructional strategies was significantly related to negative emotions (B = -.214, p < .05), accounting for 4.6% variance. These results mean that while teachers’ self-efficacy in student engagement and instructional strategies increases, their positive emotions increase. In addition, while their efficacy in instructional strategies increases, their negative emotions decrease. The findings of this study imply that teacher efficacy should be enhanced in order for teachers to experience more positive emotions in their instruction.
@InProceedings{UZUNTIRYAKIKONDAKCI2017CON,
author = {Uzuntiryaki-Kondakci, E. and Kirbulut, Z.D. and Oktay, O. and Sarici, E.},
title = {CONTRIBUTION OF SCIENCE TEACHERS’ EFFICACY BELIEFS TO THEIR EMOTIONS},
series = {10th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation},
booktitle = {ICERI2017 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-697-6957-7},
issn = {2340-1095},
doi = {10.21125/iceri.2017.1799},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/iceri.2017.1799},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Seville, Spain},
month = {16-18 November, 2017},
year = {2017},
pages = {6867}}
TY - CONF
AU - E. Uzuntiryaki-Kondakci AU - Z.D. Kirbulut AU - O. Oktay AU - E. Sarici
TI - CONTRIBUTION OF SCIENCE TEACHERS’ EFFICACY BELIEFS TO THEIR EMOTIONS
SN - 978-84-697-6957-7/2340-1095
DO - 10.21125/iceri.2017.1799
PY - 2017
Y1 - 16-18 November, 2017
CI - Seville, Spain
JO - 10th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
JA - ICERI2017 Proceedings
SP - 6867
EP - 6867
ER -
E. Uzuntiryaki-Kondakci, Z.D. Kirbulut, O. Oktay, E. Sarici (2017) CONTRIBUTION OF SCIENCE TEACHERS’ EFFICACY BELIEFS TO THEIR EMOTIONS, ICERI2017 Proceedings, p. 6867.
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