About this paper

Appears in:
Page: 234 (abstract only)
Publication year: 2017
ISBN: 978-84-697-3777-4
ISSN: 2340-1117
doi: 10.21125/edulearn.2017.1054

Conference name: 9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 3-5 July, 2017
Location: Barcelona, Spain

STRATEGIES TOWARDS PLURILINGUALISM - HOW STUDENTS SPEAK MORE IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES AND ACHIEVE BETTER RESULTS IN EUROPEAN LANGUAGE EXAMS

I. Stritzelberger

Otto-Hahn-Gymnasium Ostfildern (GERMANY)
The aims of this project are to achieve better oral skills and to increase students’ self-confidence when taking language exams. This promotes the final goal, which is better employability of young people because of better language skills.

The methodology used to achieve this are above all CLIL-style workshops, which are backed up by English. Secondly, students create their own practice material, which helps them understand language problems and language exams better. Methods of peer-teaching are used.

Working together and communicating with others in international and intercultural meetings not only increases understanding but leads to a noticeable improvement of personal and professional skills. These experiences motivate young people to continue their studies and add on to their language portfolio.

Here is one example to show how this works in a European context in which schools from Estonia, Finland, Scotland, Italy and Germany work together.
With an international meeting in Italy ahead, participating students (who do not speak Italian but French, e.g.) are prepared for the visit with language cards and phrases (level A1); for pronunciation and revision, they practice with school mates who take Italian. In Italy, they work together with other international students in workshops which are conducted in Italian. Because of the environment and their language basics they cope; more complicated matters are additionally explained in English. Since the students live in families during their stay, they are also surrounded by the Italian language in their hosts’ homes and they can use simple phrases. Understanding the workshops and participating in conversations makes them more confident.

Back home, they continue practicing their language skills with tasks and games to master the Italian language test level A1. They also create their own practice material. While teachers prepare them for the written and the listening parts, school mates practice the oral exam parts with them.
With these preparations, all eight students who participated in the Italian visit and the workshops passed the language exam and can now add the A1 Italiano certificate to their language portfolio.

In a European context, this increases their employability; it also serves as a personal motivation for these young people to acquire more knowledge about other languages and people.
@InProceedings{STRITZELBERGER2017STR,
author = {Stritzelberger, I.},
title = {STRATEGIES TOWARDS PLURILINGUALISM - HOW STUDENTS SPEAK MORE IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES AND ACHIEVE BETTER RESULTS IN EUROPEAN LANGUAGE EXAMS},
series = {9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN17 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-697-3777-4},
issn = {2340-1117},
doi = {10.21125/edulearn.2017.1054},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/edulearn.2017.1054},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {3-5 July, 2017},
year = {2017},
pages = {234}}
TY - CONF
AU - I. Stritzelberger
TI - STRATEGIES TOWARDS PLURILINGUALISM - HOW STUDENTS SPEAK MORE IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES AND ACHIEVE BETTER RESULTS IN EUROPEAN LANGUAGE EXAMS
SN - 978-84-697-3777-4/2340-1117
DO - 10.21125/edulearn.2017.1054
PY - 2017
Y1 - 3-5 July, 2017
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN17 Proceedings
SP - 234
EP - 234
ER -
I. Stritzelberger (2017) STRATEGIES TOWARDS PLURILINGUALISM - HOW STUDENTS SPEAK MORE IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES AND ACHIEVE BETTER RESULTS IN EUROPEAN LANGUAGE EXAMS, EDULEARN17 Proceedings, p. 234.
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