About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 3233-3237
Publication year: 2009
ISBN: 978-84-613-2953-3
ISSN: 2340-1095

Conference name: 2nd International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
Dates: 16-18 November, 2009
Location: Madrid, Spain

INTERVENTION/EDUCATIONAL STRATEGIES FOR STUDENTS WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS

L. Saporito-Hines

National Louis University (UNITED STATES)
"A teacher was my salvation...didn't see labels, just underlying talents...came into my world.
Temple Grandin
There are several general teaching considerations a teacher must be cognizant of in order to effectively teach children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The key is a structured classroom setting. There are three components to a structured classroom: physical structure, individual structure and a structured work system. Teacher trainers and professionals often are knowledgeable of the importance of structure, but often times do not successfully implement these components in the classroom. I have found these critical features of a structured classroom to be an effective methodology for students of all ages that are on the Spectrum. In addition, there is research to support the hypothesis that these methodologies have proven to be effective for children in general educational settings, especially those children who have proven to be either academically or behaviorally challenged.

How do you teach students with Autism? "No two autistic children are alike......The goal is to observe and find specific pattern of response each child exhibits." Temple Grandin Emergence: Labeled Autistic
An understanding of how children with Autism think is found in the work of people like Temple Grandin. Individuals with Autism are unique, like everyone. No one program will meet the needs of every child with Autism. The focus of my presentation will be on specific interventions/strategies that work. The first structure for discussion is the physical structure. The main components
of this structure are routines (an organized environment), visual aids (charts posted to be used is for student's daily schedule), labeling the sections of the classroom with specific activities and locations, temporal routines such as visual time, and the use of consistent visual cues and supports that will enable the child to successfully navigate his/her day. The second structure is the individual structure that includes a Picture Exchange System (PECS), a behavior program that supports general education expectations, and various cues or prompts that would give students notice of expected due dates, change of routine, field trips, assemblies etc.
The third structure is the work system. The three types of routines: spatial, temporal, and instructional.The work systems must maintain and support these routines.Teachers need to work from the strengths of the students with Autism and the catalyst for finding their strengths are structured classroom settings that incorporate the spatial, temporal, and instructional routines.

All theories and methodologies cited in my paper will be supported by the most recent research in Autism Spectrum Disorders and my teaching experiences over the last two decades.
@InProceedings{SAPORITOHINES2009INT,
author = {Saporito-Hines, L.},
title = {INTERVENTION/EDUCATIONAL STRATEGIES FOR STUDENTS WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS},
series = {2nd International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation},
booktitle = {ICERI2009 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-613-2953-3},
issn = {2340-1095},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Madrid, Spain},
month = {16-18 November, 2009},
year = {2009},
pages = {3233-3237}}
TY - CONF
AU - L. Saporito-Hines
TI - INTERVENTION/EDUCATIONAL STRATEGIES FOR STUDENTS WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS
SN - 978-84-613-2953-3/2340-1095
PY - 2009
Y1 - 16-18 November, 2009
CI - Madrid, Spain
JO - 2nd International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
JA - ICERI2009 Proceedings
SP - 3233
EP - 3237
ER -
L. Saporito-Hines (2009) INTERVENTION/EDUCATIONAL STRATEGIES FOR STUDENTS WITH AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS, ICERI2009 Proceedings, pp. 3233-3237.
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