About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 3514-3520
Publication year: 2011
ISBN: 978-84-615-0441-1
ISSN: 2340-1117

Conference name: 3rd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 4-6 July, 2011
Location: Barcelona, Spain

INCORPORATING THE IPAD INTO THE BASIC COMMUNICATION COURSE: PIONEERING PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICES [AND PITFALLS]

R. Robinson, J. McNellis

Saint Xavier University (UNITED STATES)
As noted by Turman and Schrodt (2005), “The use of instructional technologies to deliver course content has been truly explosive” (p. 110). Consequently, departments, programs, and their faculty are adopting computer mediated communication more to assist them with course content and assignments (Romano, Lowry, & Roberts, 2007) resulting in Internet use becoming a significant medium for instruction (Bejerano, 2008). Another driver of technological evolution is the Millennial student, individuals born in or after 1982 (Oblinger, 2003), who account for nearly 75 million of the U.S. population (Thielfoldt & Scheef, 2004) and who have expectations about technology and its use in the classroom and workplace. Although instructional technologies are forging ahead quickly and the Millennial student expects various kinds of technological learning experiences, many postsecondary institutions are confronted with budgetary shortfalls and financial difficulties. In such financially challenging times, how can institutions of higher education continue to implement new instructional technologies in the classroom that support student learning and promote career readiness skills via computer mediated communication, Internet use, and mobile technologies as learning tools? In financially restrictive times what kind of strategies can institutions practice to keep pace with the evolution of technology as well as make effective decisions regarding what kind of technology to adopt in an instructional setting? How can these tools be used to enhance student engagement and learning and to assess course effectiveness? The purpose of this paper is to explore the questions posed via a case study set in a period of budgetary cutbacks which consists of one postsecondary institution’s Department of Communication’s curricular redesign, development and modification of a general education oral communication course to include iPad technology. Consequently, information about technological choices, product rationale, and instructor perspectives about the implementation of iPad technology as it relates to including the device into a course as well as across course sections is discussed. Additional information is shared regarding how the product is used to engage students in the learning process, instructor lessons learned regarding mobile technology, the pedagogical implications and pitfalls for student learning, and instructor recommendations for incorporating the iPad into course curriculum and classroom practices that increase levels of student learning. An instructor and student assessment of the iPad experience in the classroom setting is also provided.
@InProceedings{ROBINSON2011INC,
author = {Robinson, R. and McNellis, J.},
title = {INCORPORATING THE IPAD INTO THE BASIC COMMUNICATION COURSE: PIONEERING PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICES [AND PITFALLS]},
series = {3rd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN11 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-615-0441-1},
issn = {2340-1117},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {4-6 July, 2011},
year = {2011},
pages = {3514-3520}}
TY - CONF
AU - R. Robinson AU - J. McNellis
TI - INCORPORATING THE IPAD INTO THE BASIC COMMUNICATION COURSE: PIONEERING PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICES [AND PITFALLS]
SN - 978-84-615-0441-1/2340-1117
PY - 2011
Y1 - 4-6 July, 2011
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 3rd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN11 Proceedings
SP - 3514
EP - 3520
ER -
R. Robinson, J. McNellis (2011) INCORPORATING THE IPAD INTO THE BASIC COMMUNICATION COURSE: PIONEERING PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICES [AND PITFALLS], EDULEARN11 Proceedings, pp. 3514-3520.
User:
Pass: