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Appears in:
Pages: 3611-3617
Publication year: 2017
ISBN: 978-84-697-6957-7
ISSN: 2340-1095
doi: 10.21125/iceri.2017.0979

Conference name: 10th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
Dates: 16-18 November, 2017
Location: Seville, Spain

PSYCHOPHYSICAL SECURITY AND ADEQUATE SOCIAL ADAPTATION OF STUDENTS: TRAINING COURSE

V. Popova1, V. Kourova1, V. Parskaya2, I. Koryukalov1, A. Krapivina2

1South Ural State University (RUSSIAN FEDERATION)
2South Ural State Agrarian University (RUSSIAN FEDERATION)
Increasing numbers of people have been falling victims to “biosocial” overreactions to extreme situations all over the world. Educational institutions tend to overlook the problem. It was the Goal of this research to study psychophysical functions in university students, following the adoption and embedment of psychophysical security course into the academic curriculum. The program included a theoretical course in psychophysiology of the central nervous system and psychological training sessions to teach students psychophysical self-regulation techniques and normal behavior. EEG measurements were taken in compliance with the 10-20 systems; psychomotor reactions were recorded by NS Test 2003 suite [8]; heartbeat rate and blood pressure measurements were also taken. The subjects also did the following tests: the Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory [9], neuroticism test, and stress tolerance test. The Results of our research suggested that students had enhanced functional levels of the central nervous system, psychoemotional status, reduced anxiety, and normalized bioelectric processes in the brain upon completion of the course.Decreased heartbeat rate figures and a tendency to blood pressure reduction were found in all of the subjects, following psychophysical relaxation sessions. E.g., heartbeat rates decreased in the OG from 74.2 ± 2.1 to 68.4 ± 1.9 bpm in the males and from 75.3 ± 2.4 to 69.5 ± 2.0 bpm in the females after relaxation sessions.(Р<0.05), while no significant changes were observed in the CGs. Generally improved psychomotor reaction rates after relaxation sessions, all of the reaction rates being higher in the males than in the females. It is worth noting that simple optic motor reaction rates were lower in the males than in the females before they took the course. The psychological testing data suggested that there were significantly lower neuroticism values observed in the OG than in the CG, which indicated that the OG had developed higher emotional tolerance, which contributed to retaining more organized behaviors in both ordinary and stressful situations. Those practicing psychophysical self-regulations also had lower neoru-psychical tenseness (NPT) values. The questionnaire survey and polling results suggested that the students who had mastered self-regulatory skills had become more confident, took a deeper interest in the majors, and tended to more advanced studies. A poll of five student cohorts found that the respondents had lower overall vulnerability to diseases, and developed better mood, better health, improved relationships with their family members and friends, a sense of unity with the nature, and higher tolerance.

Conclusion, more and more people have been falling victims to overreactions caused by extreme situations, a fact that has become a matter of public concern and is often attributed to inability to control emotions and behavior. Immunity to, e.g., verbal aggressions should be instilled into children at an early age. Psychophysical self-regulation techniques are manifold; using them, anyone can create a psychophysical security system tailored to their needs to provide successful social adaptation. The results of our research have proved that psychophysical security course embedded into academic curriculum has contributed to improvement of psychoemotional status of students, their good health, and tolerance.
@InProceedings{POPOVA2017PSY,
author = {Popova, V. and Kourova, V. and Parskaya, V. and Koryukalov, I. and Krapivina, A.},
title = {PSYCHOPHYSICAL SECURITY AND ADEQUATE SOCIAL ADAPTATION OF STUDENTS: TRAINING COURSE},
series = {10th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation},
booktitle = {ICERI2017 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-697-6957-7},
issn = {2340-1095},
doi = {10.21125/iceri.2017.0979},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/iceri.2017.0979},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Seville, Spain},
month = {16-18 November, 2017},
year = {2017},
pages = {3611-3617}}
TY - CONF
AU - V. Popova AU - V. Kourova AU - V. Parskaya AU - I. Koryukalov AU - A. Krapivina
TI - PSYCHOPHYSICAL SECURITY AND ADEQUATE SOCIAL ADAPTATION OF STUDENTS: TRAINING COURSE
SN - 978-84-697-6957-7/2340-1095
DO - 10.21125/iceri.2017.0979
PY - 2017
Y1 - 16-18 November, 2017
CI - Seville, Spain
JO - 10th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
JA - ICERI2017 Proceedings
SP - 3611
EP - 3617
ER -
V. Popova, V. Kourova, V. Parskaya, I. Koryukalov, A. Krapivina (2017) PSYCHOPHYSICAL SECURITY AND ADEQUATE SOCIAL ADAPTATION OF STUDENTS: TRAINING COURSE, ICERI2017 Proceedings, pp. 3611-3617.
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