About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 1392-1396
Publication year: 2015
ISBN: 978-84-606-8243-1
ISSN: 2340-1117

Conference name: 7th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 6-8 July, 2015
Location: Barcelona, Spain

IRONIC RHETORIC IN BUSINESS ENGLISH COURSES FROM FUNCTIONAL LINGUISTICS PERSPECTIVE

E.V. Ponomarenko1, E.N. Malyuga2

1Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO University) at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Russia (RUSSIAN FEDERATION)
2Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (RUSSIAN FEDERATION)
The objective of the present work is to analyze one of the vivid trends in language of business, namely a more active use of ironic utterances in any communication formats, including formal ones, and how it has to be reflected in Business English courses. The reasons for special attention to ironic rhetoric in business circles are quite substantial.

Irony has always contributed to English native speakers' mentality (see, for instance, works by Peter Mandler, George Mikes, Frank Stringfellow Jr., Robin Shoaps, Ernie Lepore and Matthew Stone, etc.). But as for institutional discourses, they have traditionally restricted the free use of figurative language devices including irony. And this has been well-grounded, as the necessity to interact on a mutually beneficial and stimulating basis usually drives business partners to being cautious in order to avoid any possible misunderstanding, psychological discomfort or offence; while irony may be perceived by the recipient as a dubious, unpleasant or even unacceptable mode of verbal behaviour. Still today more and more experts in business communication admit that, following the general process of social and professional interaction democratization, ironic utterances are growing in number in Business English of different discourse registers.

The authors of the current presentation focus on two main aspects of the topic:
1) which linguistic facets are typical, acceptable and/or advisable for ironic business communication;
2) what should Business English teachers do to elaborate the optimal methods of teaching entrepreneurs and other representatives of business to make the best use of irony in their professional activity.

The problem is considered with the help of methods of functional linguistics. As is known, functional linguistics is aimed at disclosing the communicative functions of language units, the purposes of their use and their pragmatic loading which affects people’s mindsets, opinions, feelings, intentions. Applying some adapted forms of linguistic functional analysis so as to reveal these aspects of ironic rhetoric in Business English courses enhances students' awareness of language being an efficient tool of handling various professional matters.

The authors come to the conclusion that analyzing ironic rhetoric in business from this perspective and implementing it in the teaching process have proved highly efficient for developing students' professionally relevant competences, especially those belonging to the analytical, systemic and communicative competence blocks.
@InProceedings{PONOMARENKO2015IRO,
author = {Ponomarenko, E.V. and Malyuga, E.N.},
title = {IRONIC RHETORIC IN BUSINESS ENGLISH COURSES FROM FUNCTIONAL LINGUISTICS PERSPECTIVE},
series = {7th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN15 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-606-8243-1},
issn = {2340-1117},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {6-8 July, 2015},
year = {2015},
pages = {1392-1396}}
TY - CONF
AU - E.V. Ponomarenko AU - E.N. Malyuga
TI - IRONIC RHETORIC IN BUSINESS ENGLISH COURSES FROM FUNCTIONAL LINGUISTICS PERSPECTIVE
SN - 978-84-606-8243-1/2340-1117
PY - 2015
Y1 - 6-8 July, 2015
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 7th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN15 Proceedings
SP - 1392
EP - 1396
ER -
E.V. Ponomarenko, E.N. Malyuga (2015) IRONIC RHETORIC IN BUSINESS ENGLISH COURSES FROM FUNCTIONAL LINGUISTICS PERSPECTIVE, EDULEARN15 Proceedings, pp. 1392-1396.
User:
Pass: