About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 6234-6238
Publication year: 2018
ISBN: 978-84-697-9480-7
ISSN: 2340-1079
doi: 10.21125/inted.2018.1467

Conference name: 12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
Dates: 5-7 March, 2018
Location: Valencia, Spain

MEDICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS’ OPINION ON TRAINING TO ADDRESS THE ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE PHENOMENON

A. Peña-Fernández1, M.D. Evans1, G. Torrado2, M.A. Peña2

1De Montfort University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences (UNITED KINGDOM)
2Universidad de Alcalá, Departamento de Ciencias Biomédicas (SPAIN)
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a natural phenomenon that affects bacteria, protozoa, viruses and fungi to confer resistance to medicines that previously killed or inhibited growth/proliferation. However, AMR is increasing due to anthropogenic factors including misuse of medicines, poor infection control practices and globalization. AMR can increase morbidity and mortality and constitutes a significant global public health issue, requiring action at local, national and global levels. The European Union has developed different educational programmes to increase awareness and promote the responsible use of antibiotics by not only healthcare workers but also directed to the general public. Examples include the “European Antibiotic Awareness Day” or the e-Bug project, which is led by Public Health England. Moreover, the Department of Health (UK) has developed a series of actions specifically designed to increase antibiotic use awareness and education, updating anti-infective guidelines and implementing surveillance and audits to combat AMR. We have developed an interactive research-led workshop in conjunction with traditional teaching methods to engage human health science students at De Montfort University (Leicester, UK) with the antibiotic resistance (ABR) phenomenon. Two sessions of two hours each were developed and initially tested with Medical Science (BMedSci) students enrolled in the level 5 module Clinical Perspectives I in 2016/2017 (n=41). The first workshop consisted of an introduction to infection control and prevention in a health care centre; in this session students established different measures to prevent Clostridium difficile infection following the “epic3” guidelines for preventing healthcare-associated infections in National Health Service hospitals in England (Loveday et al., 2014). Moreover, students completed a mini-case study related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) following previous similar experiences reported by our group. The second session was related with ABR, in which students needed to develop a public health intervention strategy to address this phenomenon targeting three groups:
a) general public;
b) pharmacists and healthcare workers; and
c) policymakers (with a focus on protecting the environment).

To overcome time constraints, students were provided with up-to-date peer-reviewed articles and worked in groups. In both workshops, students also critically analysed ABR articles published in non-scientific websites and media so they could tackle interventions to increase awareness of antibiotic use in the population. The research-led workshops were well-received by BMedSci students, as evidenced by their favourable evaluation. Thus, the validated feedback questionnaire (n=41) indicated that 90.5% of students enjoyed these sessions; only 5% attendees reported that the articles and exercises provided were difficult to understand. Futhermore, 83% of students considered that they could implement some health interventions to reduce ABR phenomena. Finally, 94% reported that they gained knowledge to improve hygiene and infection control in a hospital. The workshops created could improve students’ awareness about ABR and provide them with skills to identify appropriate public health measures to minimise this public threat. However, we consider that more efforts should be taken to increase ABR awareness in these students as they are destined to work in the health sector.
@InProceedings{PENAFERNANDEZ2018MED,
author = {Pe{\~n}a-Fern{\'{a}}ndez, A. and Evans, M.D. and Torrado, G. and Pe{\~n}a, M.A.},
title = {MEDICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS’ OPINION ON TRAINING TO ADDRESS THE ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE PHENOMENON},
series = {12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference},
booktitle = {INTED2018 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-697-9480-7},
issn = {2340-1079},
doi = {10.21125/inted.2018.1467},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/inted.2018.1467},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Valencia, Spain},
month = {5-7 March, 2018},
year = {2018},
pages = {6234-6238}}
TY - CONF
AU - A. Peña-Fernández AU - M.D. Evans AU - G. Torrado AU - M.A. Peña
TI - MEDICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS’ OPINION ON TRAINING TO ADDRESS THE ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE PHENOMENON
SN - 978-84-697-9480-7/2340-1079
DO - 10.21125/inted.2018.1467
PY - 2018
Y1 - 5-7 March, 2018
CI - Valencia, Spain
JO - 12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
JA - INTED2018 Proceedings
SP - 6234
EP - 6238
ER -
A. Peña-Fernández, M.D. Evans, G. Torrado, M.A. Peña (2018) MEDICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS’ OPINION ON TRAINING TO ADDRESS THE ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE PHENOMENON, INTED2018 Proceedings, pp. 6234-6238.
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