About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 2431-2434
Publication year: 2017
ISBN: 978-84-697-3777-4
ISSN: 2340-1117
doi: 10.21125/edulearn.2017.1504

Conference name: 9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 3-5 July, 2017
Location: Barcelona, Spain

PERCEIVED BENEFITS AND ACTUAL USE OF TECHNOLOGY IN ACADEMIC TEACHING –– EVIDENCE FROM AN ENGINEERING COLLEGE

G. Naveh1, A. Shelef2

1Shamoon College of Engineering (ISRAEL)
2Sapir Academic College (ISRAEL)
In the past few decades, profusion of researches examined the possible added value of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) integration into higher education teaching. The potential benefits identified by researchers are divers and numerous (e.g. organizational, social and financial). However, most of the studies focused on the pedagogical contribution of such integration. Surprisingly, little attention is devoted to the perceived benefits of the integration by the instructors, specifically vis-à-vis their actual use of technology in teaching.

Hence, this study focuses on the degree and manner of instructors' use of technology in their classroom, while exploring the reasons for ICT integration, as they are perceived by them. To this end, 32 instructors, who attended a professional development session, were asked on several aspects of ICT integration in teaching, using a paper and a pencil questionnaire.

Respondents indicated the high importance of ICT integration in academic teaching and more than eighty percent reported using ICT in various ways (e.g. course management, inside and outside class interaction), and more than half reported use of technology in a way that changes traditional academic pedagogy. However, almost thirty percent expressed resistance to the integration of ICT in academic teaching. Moreover, respondents’ reasoning of the importance of ICT integration focused on enhanced efficiency, alignment with current trends and generating interest in class sessions. Only few of the respondents’ explanations addressed the learning process and none referred to its outcomes.

These results suggest contradictions between the beliefs and actions of the instructors regarding the integration of ICT in their teaching. Most of the instructors use technology to enhance their pedagogy, while two third of them indicated they believe technology contributes to higher education as a marketing and administrative tool. This interesting gap is in a reverse direction to gaps often found during transformation, which begins with a change in the declarative level before it is exhibited in actions. This may be due to the very gradual, bottom up nature of the process of ICT integration in higher education. Moreover, most of the instructors performing it are researchers with limited formal pedagogic knowledge and education. It is likely they practice what they feel will benefit their students, without consciously analyzing the pedagogical meaning and implication of their actions.
@InProceedings{NAVEH2017PER,
author = {Naveh, G. and Shelef, A.},
title = {PERCEIVED BENEFITS AND ACTUAL USE OF TECHNOLOGY IN ACADEMIC TEACHING –– EVIDENCE FROM AN ENGINEERING COLLEGE},
series = {9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN17 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-697-3777-4},
issn = {2340-1117},
doi = {10.21125/edulearn.2017.1504},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/edulearn.2017.1504},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {3-5 July, 2017},
year = {2017},
pages = {2431-2434}}
TY - CONF
AU - G. Naveh AU - A. Shelef
TI - PERCEIVED BENEFITS AND ACTUAL USE OF TECHNOLOGY IN ACADEMIC TEACHING –– EVIDENCE FROM AN ENGINEERING COLLEGE
SN - 978-84-697-3777-4/2340-1117
DO - 10.21125/edulearn.2017.1504
PY - 2017
Y1 - 3-5 July, 2017
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN17 Proceedings
SP - 2431
EP - 2434
ER -
G. Naveh, A. Shelef (2017) PERCEIVED BENEFITS AND ACTUAL USE OF TECHNOLOGY IN ACADEMIC TEACHING –– EVIDENCE FROM AN ENGINEERING COLLEGE, EDULEARN17 Proceedings, pp. 2431-2434.
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