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Appears in:
Pages: 4951-4954
Publication year: 2011
ISBN: 978-84-614-7423-3
ISSN: 2340-1079

Conference name: 5th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
Dates: 7-9 March, 2011
Location: Valencia, Spain

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN COMPUTER SELF-EFFICACY AT COLLEGE STUDENTS

E. Nanu, I. Scheau

"1 Decembrie 1918" University of Alba Iulia (ROMANIA)
The present research examined college students’ gender differences in computer experience (frequency and types of computer use), perceived self-efficacy and computer value beliefs.
Previous research attested significant gender differences in attitude toward technology, computer self-efficacy beliefs, and computer value beliefs, favoring male students (Nelson & Cooper, 1997). Researches showed that differences in motivation for computer learning are related to perceived social expectations toward using computers (Vekiri & Chronaki, 2008). Sex stereotypes and gender expectations impede girls’ involvement in computer activities. Fewer exercises lead to higher levers of anxiety and lower computer knowledge (Fe & Freeman, 2008). However, today computers can be used for a variety of activities, some more suitable for girls, for example the socializing sites. This diversity of options in using computers might reduce the gender gap in general computer perceived self efficacy. This research will try to answer questions regarding computer self-efficacy perceptions, the relation between computer self-efficacy and different types of computer use, and differences in computer self-efficacy and computer value beliefs based on gender, frequency of computer use and type of computer experience. 194 college students (mean age = 19.6 Std. Deviation 1.2), enrolled in social sciences studies, 102 girls and 92 boys participated in the study. Descriptive statistics revealed that the mean for perceived self-efficacy is 60.99 for girls and 65.40 for boys (F = 9.88, df1 sig .002). The mean for value beliefs is 21.37 for girls and 21.07 for boys. Correlations between variables show that perceived computer self-efficacy strongly correlates with gender (.221, sig. .002), proficiency rating (.550, sig .0001), frequency of computer use (.385, sig .0001), and computer value beliefs (.321, sig .0001). Anova tests will be used to explore how computer self-efficacy and computer value beliefs vary based on sex, frequency of computer use and the types of computer activities.
@InProceedings{NANU2011GEN,
author = {Nanu, E. and Scheau, I.},
title = {GENDER DIFFERENCES IN COMPUTER SELF-EFFICACY AT COLLEGE STUDENTS},
series = {5th International Technology, Education and Development Conference},
booktitle = {INTED2011 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-614-7423-3},
issn = {2340-1079},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Valencia, Spain},
month = {7-9 March, 2011},
year = {2011},
pages = {4951-4954}}
TY - CONF
AU - E. Nanu AU - I. Scheau
TI - GENDER DIFFERENCES IN COMPUTER SELF-EFFICACY AT COLLEGE STUDENTS
SN - 978-84-614-7423-3/2340-1079
PY - 2011
Y1 - 7-9 March, 2011
CI - Valencia, Spain
JO - 5th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
JA - INTED2011 Proceedings
SP - 4951
EP - 4954
ER -
E. Nanu, I. Scheau (2011) GENDER DIFFERENCES IN COMPUTER SELF-EFFICACY AT COLLEGE STUDENTS, INTED2011 Proceedings, pp. 4951-4954.
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