About this paper

Appears in:
Page: 5895
Publication year: 2011
ISBN: 978-84-615-0441-1
ISSN: 2340-1117

Conference name: 3rd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 4-6 July, 2011
Location: Barcelona, Spain

RECENT INNOVATIONS IN BEHAVIORAL SELF-MANAGEMENT: TACTILE-CUED SELF-MONITORING INTERVENTIONS TO IMPROVE ACADEMIC PRODUCTIVITY

D. McDougall

University of Hawaii (UNITED STATES)
In this presentation, we describe results of applied behavior analysis intervention studies in which students with and without disabilities use a relatively new form of self-monitoring, that is, tactile-cued self-monitoring, to improve their academic productivity. We highlight the procedures and outcomes from a series of teacher-designed intervention studies that we conducted over the past few years. In two of the studies, student performance improved by a factor of about three times from baseline phases to intervention phases after students used tactile-cued self-monitoring. In Study 1, the percentage of assigned Algebra work that a high school student completed increased from a mean of 21% to a mean of 66%. In Study 2, time required for a middle school student to complete his assigned, daily, independent English assignment decreased from a mean of 30 minutes to a mean of 11 minutes. In Study 3, which employed a multiple baseline across multiple participants, and a new design variation called the range-bound changing criterion design, each participant improved their math fluency (correct answers per minute) on basic math calculations after they used tactile-cued self-monitoring to monitor the pace of their work during independent practice. We also provide practical tips for teachers who have had the irksome experience of viewing a student who produces little work during independent practice activities, especially when that student has the capacity to produce. As with audio-cued and visually-cued versions of self-monitoring, teachers can train students to use tactile-cued self-monitoring to improve academic productivity. These self-monitoring techniques can help teachers minimize the need to use traditional behavior management techniques, particularly frequent verbal reminders, proximity control, and response cost, for students who tend to be off-task during what should be independent practice activities. Overall, results of these studies are consistent with prior findings that indicate self-monitoring techniques help students manage their own behavior, reduce students' over-reliance on teachers' cues, free up teachers' time, and improve students' academic productivity during independent practice tasks in classroom settings.
@InProceedings{MCDOUGALL2011REC,
author = {McDougall, D.},
title = {RECENT INNOVATIONS IN BEHAVIORAL SELF-MANAGEMENT: TACTILE-CUED SELF-MONITORING INTERVENTIONS TO IMPROVE ACADEMIC PRODUCTIVITY},
series = {3rd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN11 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-615-0441-1},
issn = {2340-1117},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {4-6 July, 2011},
year = {2011},
pages = {5895}}
TY - CONF
AU - D. McDougall
TI - RECENT INNOVATIONS IN BEHAVIORAL SELF-MANAGEMENT: TACTILE-CUED SELF-MONITORING INTERVENTIONS TO IMPROVE ACADEMIC PRODUCTIVITY
SN - 978-84-615-0441-1/2340-1117
PY - 2011
Y1 - 4-6 July, 2011
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 3rd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN11 Proceedings
SP - 5895
EP - 5895
ER -
D. McDougall (2011) RECENT INNOVATIONS IN BEHAVIORAL SELF-MANAGEMENT: TACTILE-CUED SELF-MONITORING INTERVENTIONS TO IMPROVE ACADEMIC PRODUCTIVITY, EDULEARN11 Proceedings, p. 5895.
User:
Pass: