About this paper

Appears in:
Page: 5962 (abstract only)
Publication year: 2014
ISBN: 978-84-617-2484-0
ISSN: 2340-1095

Conference name: 7th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
Dates: 17-19 November, 2014
Location: Seville, Spain

EXTENDED PROGRAMMES TO IMPROVE SUCCESS RATE: DOES IT WORK?

P. Marais, F. Marais

Tshwane University of Technology (SOUTH AFRICA)
Students failing chemistry, physics and mathematics are a major contribution to the low success rate of programmes in science and engineering. This leads to a prolonged study period, overcrowded classrooms, low graduation rate and subsequent loss of subsidy to the university. In order to improve graduation rates various intervention techniques, such as extended programmes, have been introduced by most universities in South Africa. Tshwane University of Technology (TUT) is no exception and such programmes are included as options for most first year students.

Research Question:
Does an extended programme make a substantial difference to the success of first year chemistry students?

Traditionally all science and engineering programmes are offered in a semester format with the result that the subject content of the critically important basic science subjects (physics, mathematics and chemistry) are covered in only one semester. An extended programme offers these subjects over a full year.

Admission to the extended programme is based on final school leaving (grade 12) examination scores. All students must meet the minimum entrance requirements and students with the lowest scores are placed in the Extended Programme.

All first year chemistry students write a chemistry concepts test (CCT) during the first week of the year but these results are not considered when placing students in either the semester or extended programme. The same test is written at the end of each study period. The normalised gains achieved by each group from 2010 to 2013 will be compared in this paper.

The Department of Chemistry at TUT offers chemistry as a first year subject to more than 700 students every year. The students register for either Chemistry 1A for the physical science and engineering students or Chemistry 1B for the life and health science students. Each of these two subjects have a semester and a year option.

Results from the chemical concepts tests indicate a gain in understanding of basic concepts when the subject is offered over a year. Progress of students in subsequent years of study will also be discussed in this paper.
@InProceedings{MARAIS2014EXT,
author = {Marais, P. and Marais, F.},
title = {EXTENDED PROGRAMMES TO IMPROVE SUCCESS RATE: DOES IT WORK?},
series = {7th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation},
booktitle = {ICERI2014 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-617-2484-0},
issn = {2340-1095},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Seville, Spain},
month = {17-19 November, 2014},
year = {2014},
pages = {5962}}
TY - CONF
AU - P. Marais AU - F. Marais
TI - EXTENDED PROGRAMMES TO IMPROVE SUCCESS RATE: DOES IT WORK?
SN - 978-84-617-2484-0/2340-1095
PY - 2014
Y1 - 17-19 November, 2014
CI - Seville, Spain
JO - 7th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
JA - ICERI2014 Proceedings
SP - 5962
EP - 5962
ER -
P. Marais, F. Marais (2014) EXTENDED PROGRAMMES TO IMPROVE SUCCESS RATE: DOES IT WORK?, ICERI2014 Proceedings, p. 5962.
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