About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 2855-2861
Publication year: 2009
ISBN: 978-84-613-2953-3
ISSN: 2340-1095

Conference name: 2nd International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
Dates: 16-18 November, 2009
Location: Madrid, Spain

DESIGN CONCEPT CREATION AND COMMUNICATION : THE CONCEPT PYRAMID

T. Lesko

Wentworth Institute of Technology (UNITED STATES)
This paper will delineate the methods the author has employed in teaching design concept creation for architecture and related environmental design disciplines. Both written and graphic communication of the developed design concept are explored and defined as an approach to design and the subsequent application and communication of the fully developed concept.

Methods of teaching design may vary, however, a fundamental issue that faces students in design studios is the development of a solid design concept and the subsequent communication of that concept, not only to oneself for the development of the design, but also to teachers, reviewers and eventually . . . clients. The "concept pyramid" is a straightforward method I developed that illustrates what concepts are and how to develop a complete, well founded concept.

This paper deals with teaching the development of concepts and explains the methods the author has used to teach the process, exploration, development, analysis and communication of design concepts in an easy to understand fashion. By utilizing a professional designer's concept example, developmental design sketches and final design drawings in "case study" fashion, the design concept is dissected into identifiable parts. Those parts are defined and explanations are given on how a student should similarly work on his/her own design concept.

In this paper, I relate a well-developed concept to the shape of a pyramid, placing the concept title at the top of the pyramid. It is the concept title that gives our work focus. We must design with focus. While the title sums up the concept in precious few words, it is the rationale behind the title that is ultimately important and that is where the depth of the concept is explained. Relating the title and depth to a pyramid - the title is on top, the rationale/depth is what supports it - beneath, like a pyramid.

This process has been used successfully by the author at different levels of student design development.

Outline:
• Background
• Researching Profound Qualities
- verbal and sketch exploration
• Identifying Personal Vision
• Establishing a Design Direction
- verbal and sketch exploration
• Developing the Concept Title
• Defining Design Project Goals
- imbedding the concept statement
• Explaining the Design Project's Purpose
• Comparison of Verbal Concept (process) to Final Design Drawing (synthesis, communication)
@InProceedings{LESKO2009DES,
author = {Lesko, T.},
title = {DESIGN CONCEPT CREATION AND COMMUNICATION : THE CONCEPT PYRAMID},
series = {2nd International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation},
booktitle = {ICERI2009 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-613-2953-3},
issn = {2340-1095},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Madrid, Spain},
month = {16-18 November, 2009},
year = {2009},
pages = {2855-2861}}
TY - CONF
AU - T. Lesko
TI - DESIGN CONCEPT CREATION AND COMMUNICATION : THE CONCEPT PYRAMID
SN - 978-84-613-2953-3/2340-1095
PY - 2009
Y1 - 16-18 November, 2009
CI - Madrid, Spain
JO - 2nd International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
JA - ICERI2009 Proceedings
SP - 2855
EP - 2861
ER -
T. Lesko (2009) DESIGN CONCEPT CREATION AND COMMUNICATION : THE CONCEPT PYRAMID, ICERI2009 Proceedings, pp. 2855-2861.
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