About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 10372-10376
Publication year: 2017
ISBN: 978-84-697-3777-4
ISSN: 2340-1117
doi: 10.21125/edulearn.2017.0963

Conference name: 9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 3-5 July, 2017
Location: Barcelona, Spain

A FLIPPED CLASSROOM IS AN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM: MAKING THE MOST OF CLASS TIME FOR THE MOST LEARNERS

R. Leporati, K. Tilton

University of Cincinnati (UNITED STATES)
By providing students with material prior to library instruction sessions, also known as flipped classroom activities, academic librarians have found an effective solution to two major challenges of the modern university: Time constraints and inclusion of diverse learners. We discovered that providing materials for students prior to class meant we could not only make the most of our time together, but also accommodate students who need different kinds of access. Understanding how we do this illustrates the concept of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), a vital framework for improving the classroom through technology.

For us, the inciting challenge was time. Librarians have long supported the mission of universities by leading instruction sessions on library resources and information literacy more broadly. In the most common model, a faculty member brings his or her class to the library for a single session taught by an instructional librarian. The librarian introduces key research concepts as well as services that will support them throughout their academic careers. In what is often a 50-minute meeting time, we must teach multiple, complicated concepts. One of our most powerful tools for making the most of our in-class time is the flipped classroom. We give students assignments before they come to class, grounding them in information literacy concepts and skills. This can take many different forms depending on the exact course material. A beginning research course watches a video on developing a research question and then filled out a worksheet exploring their individual topic. By contrast, an advanced robotics course might be given a searching task using a subject-specific database.

In building the tools to deliver these flipped lessons, librarians identify and/or create online learning objects. We record screen-captures, build interactive tutorials, develop graphic organizers, and edit videos. This work is extremely labor-intensive but also extremely effective in engaging students through technology. Most importantly, it was through time spent on these projects that we really started wrestling with our other major challenge: Inclusion of diverse learners. To address how we might go about this, we used UDL frameworks.

Universal design says, essentially, that a solution for one type of person can actually be a solution for many. Under the UDL framework, we seek out accommodations made for one type of learner that can benefit others. For example, subtitles on instructional videos allow not just hearing impaired students to access the content, but also students who are doing their homework in a place where they cannot have the sound turned on. The hearing-impaired students’ solution means that more students will have completed their work by the time they arrive in class. Similarly, by making readings available via screen readers for visually impaired students, dyslexic students can take advantage of the same technology to engage with the material more effectively. Addressing accessibility in this way can actually lead not just to increased engagement with the material, but also improved learning outcomes.

When we adopted a UDL mindset for library instruction, we quickly discovered that making our flipped classroom activities available for more students allowed all students to better engage with the material. Most importantly, the level of work and discussion in our classes has improved exponentially.
@InProceedings{LEPORATI2017AFL,
author = {Leporati, R. and Tilton, K.},
title = {A FLIPPED CLASSROOM IS AN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM: MAKING THE MOST OF CLASS TIME FOR THE MOST LEARNERS},
series = {9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN17 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-697-3777-4},
issn = {2340-1117},
doi = {10.21125/edulearn.2017.0963},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/edulearn.2017.0963},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {3-5 July, 2017},
year = {2017},
pages = {10372-10376}}
TY - CONF
AU - R. Leporati AU - K. Tilton
TI - A FLIPPED CLASSROOM IS AN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM: MAKING THE MOST OF CLASS TIME FOR THE MOST LEARNERS
SN - 978-84-697-3777-4/2340-1117
DO - 10.21125/edulearn.2017.0963
PY - 2017
Y1 - 3-5 July, 2017
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN17 Proceedings
SP - 10372
EP - 10376
ER -
R. Leporati, K. Tilton (2017) A FLIPPED CLASSROOM IS AN INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM: MAKING THE MOST OF CLASS TIME FOR THE MOST LEARNERS, EDULEARN17 Proceedings, pp. 10372-10376.
User:
Pass: