About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 11254-11263
Publication year: 2018
ISBN: 978-84-09-02709-5
ISSN: 2340-1117
doi: 10.21125/edulearn.2018.2804

Conference name: 10th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 2-4 July, 2018
Location: Palma, Spain

THE GDP’S EFFECT ON SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS’ EXPECTATIONS IN SCIENCE CAREERS. A CASE STUDY OF THE OECD MEMBERS’ COUNTRIES

I.M. Lazar, I.O. Panisoara

University of Bucharest (ROMANIA)
One of the present-day directions of research studies in education is the aspirational profile of secondary school students. Therefore, international studies emphasize the need to identify as accurately as possible earlier determinants of career aspirations. This study examines the relationship between secondary school students’ expectations in science careers and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) members’ countries. In particular, some of PISA 2015 results have been used to analyse how different aspects of achievement motivation can be influenced by economic indicators providing more understanding about secondary school students’ aspirations-expectations in science careers. Our research contributes to this current discussion by exploring of OECD interactive platform for education and economic policy data. Using a quantitative method approach, the study examines similarities and differences across OECD countries and explores the cause-and-effect relationship between variables. The results highlights that total GDP (OECD, 2018) (in US dollars/capita, 2015) of OECD countries has a negative and significant statistical influence but reduced as intensity on percentage of students who expect to work in science-related technicians and associate professionals when they are 30 (OECD, 2016) (F (1,32)=5.407, p=0.027). Also, the total GDP of OECD members’ countries negatively influence the percentage of students who reported that they “agree” or “strongly agree” with: ”I want to be the best, whatever I do” (OECD, 2017) (F (1,32)=6.880, p=0.013) and the percentage of students who reported that they “agree” or “strongly agree” with: ”I want to be one of the best students in my class” (OECD, 2017) (F (1,32)=4.068, p=0.05). All educational actors from OECD countries members have to find new ways to inspire secondary school students’ to study science and technology more seriously even if the standard of living is good and increasing.

References:
[1] OECD. (2016). Students' attitudes towards science and expectations of science-related careers", in PISA 2015 Results (Volume I): Excellence and Equity in Education doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264266490-7-en
[2] OECD. (2017). PISA 2015 Results (Volume III): Students' Well-Being doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264273856-en
[3] OECD. (2018). Gross domestic product (GDP) (indicator) doi:10.1787/dc2f7aec-en
@InProceedings{LAZAR2018GDP,
author = {Lazar, I.M. and Panisoara, I.O.},
title = {THE GDP’S EFFECT ON SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS’ EXPECTATIONS IN SCIENCE CAREERS. A CASE STUDY OF THE OECD MEMBERS’ COUNTRIES},
series = {10th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN18 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-09-02709-5},
issn = {2340-1117},
doi = {10.21125/edulearn.2018.2804},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/edulearn.2018.2804},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Palma, Spain},
month = {2-4 July, 2018},
year = {2018},
pages = {11254-11263}}
TY - CONF
AU - I.M. Lazar AU - I.O. Panisoara
TI - THE GDP’S EFFECT ON SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS’ EXPECTATIONS IN SCIENCE CAREERS. A CASE STUDY OF THE OECD MEMBERS’ COUNTRIES
SN - 978-84-09-02709-5/2340-1117
DO - 10.21125/edulearn.2018.2804
PY - 2018
Y1 - 2-4 July, 2018
CI - Palma, Spain
JO - 10th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN18 Proceedings
SP - 11254
EP - 11263
ER -
I.M. Lazar, I.O. Panisoara (2018) THE GDP’S EFFECT ON SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS’ EXPECTATIONS IN SCIENCE CAREERS. A CASE STUDY OF THE OECD MEMBERS’ COUNTRIES, EDULEARN18 Proceedings, pp. 11254-11263.
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