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Appears in:
Pages: 5487-5490
Publication year: 2012
ISBN: 978-84-695-3491-5
ISSN: 2340-1117

Conference name: 4th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 2-4 July, 2012
Location: Barcelona, Spain

CLOSING THE ADAPTIVE LAB: FROM ISOLATION TO INTEGRATION

P. King1, N. Soto2, T. Anno1

1Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis (UNITED STATES)
2Indiana University / Harrison College (UNITED STATES)
Closing Adaptive Labs may appear to be not in the best interest of the University or the students who need adaptive equipment. This interactive panel of the practitioner, the university and community agencies will address how the Assistive Technology (AT) program at an Urban University has grown from a small collection of basic assistive technology devices to a state of having nearly all computer labs on campus equipped with state-of-the-art AT systems available to students.

The Americans with Disabilities Act mandates that universities make their programs and services accessible to individuals with disabilities. Students routinely identify that access to library materials and assistive devices such as screen enlargement and reading systems are important as well as necessary to ensure that success. Many universities have repositories of adaptive equipment located in isolated locations that are only utilized by a small number of students (Loope, 1996). Many universities do not have established policies or procedures in place to effectively address the AT needs of students. Unfortunately, this results in student AT needs based on a student self-identifying rather than a pro-active and comprehensive system (White, Wepner & Wetzel, 2003).

As universities continue to develop skills and techniques related to AT, a need to move AT from those isolated areas into the main stream technology offerings of the university is becoming clearer. Additionally, the need to build consensus among those university entities responsible for AT is critical to program success (Norris & Vasquez, 1998).

As IUPUI has developed it’s AT program over the years, the following issues and considerations have become apparent:

• Issues related to licensing of AT software
• Issues related to centralized and dedicated AT labs
• Issues related to AT hardware
• Cost considerations
• “Ownership” of responsibility to provide AT
• Student training considerations
• Faculty and staff training considerations
• Unique AT needs among students with disabilities
• Implications for non-disabled students
• Involvement of a community partner
@InProceedings{KING2012CLO2,
author = {King, P. and Soto, N. and Anno, T.},
title = {CLOSING THE ADAPTIVE LAB: FROM ISOLATION TO INTEGRATION},
series = {4th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN12 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-695-3491-5},
issn = {2340-1117},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {2-4 July, 2012},
year = {2012},
pages = {5487-5490}}
TY - CONF
AU - P. King AU - N. Soto AU - T. Anno
TI - CLOSING THE ADAPTIVE LAB: FROM ISOLATION TO INTEGRATION
SN - 978-84-695-3491-5/2340-1117
PY - 2012
Y1 - 2-4 July, 2012
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 4th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN12 Proceedings
SP - 5487
EP - 5490
ER -
P. King, N. Soto, T. Anno (2012) CLOSING THE ADAPTIVE LAB: FROM ISOLATION TO INTEGRATION, EDULEARN12 Proceedings, pp. 5487-5490.
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