About this paper

Appears in:
Page: 4360 (abstract only)
Publication year: 2018
ISBN: 978-84-09-05948-5
ISSN: 2340-1095
doi: 10.21125/iceri.2018.1979

Conference name: 11th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
Dates: 12-14 November, 2018
Location: Seville, Spain

MAKING SPACE FOR INNOVATION: TEACHER PERSPECTIVES ON A WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM

J. Jenson, B. Tomin, T. Terzopoulos

York University (CANADA)
Responding to a global economy characterized by innovation and entrepreneurship, maker spaces, tinker labs, or creation labs have garnered particular attention for their potential to support student learning (New York Hall of Science, 2013). Wearable technologies, or articles of clothing that “incorporate computer and advanced electronic technologies,” are a popular example of making (Wu, Fan, & Mattila, 2015, p. 3). The rising popularity of these creative forms of digital production further aligns with and supports a growing emphasis on STEAM pedagogy in K-12 classrooms. Research has concentrated on student learning, but a broader discussion about pedagogy and the shifts required of teachers to co-create spaces conducive to 21st century learning must be prioritized; inquiry into teachers’ experiences implementing technology into the curriculum can help fulfil this aim.

This paper describes a research project conducted by university researchers within a single classroom in Ontario, Canada which investigated the potential for teacher growth in technological pedagogy and practice. The study involved the development and piloting of a wearable technology unit as part of the grade six science and technology curriculum. Students explored e-textiles, a form of wearable technology where sensors and other electronic components such as LEDs, batteries, and circuit boards are networked together and embedded in pieces of fabric or cloth (Berzowska, 2005).

The study was conducted in four phases:
1) design of a wearable technology curriculum;
2) testing of the curriculum in an after-school program;
3) curriculum (re)design; and
4) classroom implementation.

Data collected from phase one consisted of pre- and post-surveys, field notes, photo and video documentation, and interviews with the participating teacher; it informed the curriculum (re)design with the goal that it could be delivered by a teacher with limited additional support. Qualitative data was analyzed by thematically coding field notes and interviews with the participating teacher, with emphasis on the impressions they had about student learning, challenges they faced, and suggestions for future work in this area.

While this study represents a one-off experience designing and implementing a wearable technology curriculum, it offers insight into future directions for this type of curriculum. A recurring obstacle continues to be how to support the wide range of technological confidence demonstrated by current educators; various resources must be designed to provide troubleshooting. Video/multimedia resources represent another means of supporting teacher development. Additionally, having time to see and work with curriculum materials in advance would alleviate some of the pressure less technologically-savvy teachers may have around this type of unit. Challenges therefore involve how to conceptualize curriculum interventions that are also responsive to unique teacher needs and classroom contexts.

References:
[1] Berzowska, J. (2005). Electronic Textiles: Wearable Computers, Reactive Fashion, and Soft Computation. Textile: Cloth and Culture, 3(1), 58-75.
[2] New York Hall of Science. (2013). A Blueprint: Maker Programs for Youth https://nysci.org/ wp-content/uploads/nysci_maker_blueprint.pdf
[3] Wu, L. Fan, A.A. & Mattila, A.S. (2015). Wearable technology in service delivery processes: The gender-moderated technology objectification effect. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 51, 1-7.
@InProceedings{JENSON2018MAK,
author = {Jenson, J. and Tomin, B. and Terzopoulos, T.},
title = {MAKING SPACE FOR INNOVATION: TEACHER PERSPECTIVES ON A WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM},
series = {11th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation},
booktitle = {ICERI2018 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-09-05948-5},
issn = {2340-1095},
doi = {10.21125/iceri.2018.1979},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/iceri.2018.1979},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Seville, Spain},
month = {12-14 November, 2018},
year = {2018},
pages = {4360}}
TY - CONF
AU - J. Jenson AU - B. Tomin AU - T. Terzopoulos
TI - MAKING SPACE FOR INNOVATION: TEACHER PERSPECTIVES ON A WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM
SN - 978-84-09-05948-5/2340-1095
DO - 10.21125/iceri.2018.1979
PY - 2018
Y1 - 12-14 November, 2018
CI - Seville, Spain
JO - 11th annual International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
JA - ICERI2018 Proceedings
SP - 4360
EP - 4360
ER -
J. Jenson, B. Tomin, T. Terzopoulos (2018) MAKING SPACE FOR INNOVATION: TEACHER PERSPECTIVES ON A WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM, ICERI2018 Proceedings, p. 4360.
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