NEIGHBOURHOOD DISADVANTAGES AND ATTITUDE TO SCHOOLING IN POOR URBAN SETTLEMENT IN NIGERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR DEVELOPMENT

A. Idowu, E. Amoo, M. Ajayi, B. Odewale, A. Jegede, O. Adekeye

Covenant University (NIGERIA)
The challenges facing students in 21st century are enormous especially the adolescents in secondary schools in distress and adverse neighbourhood environment. However, only limited studies have explained the interrelationships between neighbourhood environment (such as poverty, violence and its associate stress and crime) and reading culture, academic learning and performance, school dropouts, unemployable school leavers and the existence of widening gap in economic opportunities. The paper examined association between urban neighbourhood disadvantages with poor cognitive and behavioural disposition on schooling, learning and performance. Data for the study were extracted from a cross sectional survey among 1220 senior secondary schools students selected in equal proportion from 14 secondary schools in Lagos metropolis with attrition rate of 12.9%. The state was selected for being a representative of tribe and culture, urban rich and poor setting. The study adopted a measuring scale for both adverse environment and students’ disposition. The data were analyzed using univariate and binary logistic regression analysis. The findings suggest, among others, that adverse neighbourhood characteristics in urban center are connected with the poor learning attitude and learning outcomes. It recommends simultaneous emphasis on attitudinal change motivations and compulsory secondary education policy initiatives in Nigeria and across other sub-Saharan African countries.