About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 3947-3949
Publication year: 2011
ISBN: 978-84-615-3324-4
ISSN: 2340-1095

Conference name: 4th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
Dates: 14-16 November, 2011
Location: Madrid, Spain

SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION: IMPACT AND CONSEQUENCES

B. Hughes

Trinity College Dublin (IRELAND)
Aim
This research investigates the role of sexual education in relation to the concept of ‘compulsive sexual addiction’ from the perspective of the self-identified ‘sexual addict’.

Method
Adopting a qualitative approach, data collection includes a pilot-study, focus-groups, questionnaires and individual interviews involving 43 treatment providers working in clinical practice in the area of sexual health and 44 self-identified sexual addicts. Each interview is recorded and later transcribed. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) and Thematic Analysis (TA) methods are used for data analysis. Questionnaires are analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). This project has received approval from the Research Ethics Committee in the University and consent was given by the participants. This study is guided by the principles outlined in the Declaration of Helsinki 1975.

Results
41.9 % of ‘sexual addicts’ report dissatisfaction with their sexual education and state that defective sexual education was a causal factor to their sexual addiction. Addicts state that better sexual education may have prevented them from engaging in high-risk sexual behaviour which can be a contributory factor to HIV, and other sexually transmitted infections. All participants report on a range of educational interventions that have proven helpful and unhelpful in the on-going recovery from and management of sexual behaviour. In addition, ‘sexual addicts’ suggest that inadequate sexual education for clinicians may inhibit the recognition, assessment, diagnosis and treatment of ‘sexual addiction’.

Conclusions
Improved sexual education can help identify the predisposing factors and the presenting behaviours. As a result of comprehensive sexual education, prevention strategies and therapeutic interventions can be developed. These strategies are expected to lessen the development of sexual addiction, minimize the negative impact on individuals and society and ensure that every individual is enabled to pursue a fulfilling sexual life, which is central to sexual health.
@InProceedings{HUGHES2011SEX,
author = {Hughes, B.},
title = {SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION: IMPACT AND CONSEQUENCES},
series = {4th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation},
booktitle = {ICERI2011 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-615-3324-4},
issn = {2340-1095},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Madrid, Spain},
month = {14-16 November, 2011},
year = {2011},
pages = {3947-3949}}
TY - CONF
AU - B. Hughes
TI - SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION: IMPACT AND CONSEQUENCES
SN - 978-84-615-3324-4/2340-1095
PY - 2011
Y1 - 14-16 November, 2011
CI - Madrid, Spain
JO - 4th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
JA - ICERI2011 Proceedings
SP - 3947
EP - 3949
ER -
B. Hughes (2011) SEXUAL HEALTH EDUCATION: IMPACT AND CONSEQUENCES, ICERI2011 Proceedings, pp. 3947-3949.
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