TRANSNATIONAL LEARNING FOR TRANSNATIONAL TEACHING

C. Hall van den Elsen1, C. Scholz2

1RMIT University (AUSTRALIA)
2RMIT University (VIETNAM)
Transnational teaching is unarguably an increasingly important aspect of Australian universities’ activity. Recent studies (Pyvis, 2011; Dobos, 2012; Sanderson 2013) have identified challenges for faculty operating at the coal-face of their universities’ ‘transnational’ agenda

This paper provides an overview of a project undertaken under the auspices of the Australian Office for Learning and Teaching. An international collaboration between two Australian, one Malaysian and one Vietnamese university is focusing attention on the development teaching practice with transnational teaching teams. This paper is grounded empirically in a study of transnational education at two of these partner institutions, articulating the experience of working in transnational education and identifying the development needs associated with effective transnational teaching teams.

Interviews with faculty in the Australia and Vietnamese campuses of an Australian university provide the basis for the development of a model which describes the elements of a successful transnational team. The project aims to provide a better understanding of issues affecting faculty across multiple campuses, including relationship management and the establishment of a shared understanding of academic equivalence. A suite of professional development plans, an induction checklist and quick guides support the establishment and maintenance of effective transnational teaching teams.