About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 4563-4570
Publication year: 2018
ISBN: 978-84-09-02709-5
ISSN: 2340-1117
doi: 10.21125/edulearn.2018.1138

Conference name: 10th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 2-4 July, 2018
Location: Palma, Spain

PUTTING THEORY INTO PRACTICE: GAMIFICATION FOR STUDENT ENGAGEMENT

C. Garden, E.S. Rivera

Edinburgh Napier University (UNITED KINGDOM)
Gamification is the use of game design elements in a non-game contexts (Deterding et al. 2011). It is an intervention that has been used in a business setting for a number of years and is now becoming more and more applied in higher education (Dicheva et al. 2015). We present the practical implications of our Gamification for Student Engagement framework developed for Higher Education.

Landers (2014) suggests that gamification is the process of identifying, extracting, and embedding game attributes into learning, in order to affect the behaviours and attitudes that support the achievement of learning outcomes. His theory describes how this works in a successfully gamified learning situation. By employing gamification, the relationship between instructional content and the achievement of learning outcomes becomes explicit and can be altered in specific ways to affect student attitudes and behaviours oriented towards a particular learning goal. In addition to this, Bedwell’s taxonomy of game attributes (Bedwell et al. 2010) makes it theoretically possible to narrow down the game attributes that have an evidence base for supporting any given learning outcome.

Student engagement can be explained using learning theories (e.g. see Kahu 2013). This framework can be used to understand player engagement and open up the door for learning theories to explain the effect of game attributes on players and thus on students. This allows us to define the aspects and functions of the behaviours/attitudes concept that underpins the theory of gamified learning. Now that the behaviour/attitudes that can be affected by gamification are better defined, we can start to consider exactly what gamification is affecting in engagement, how this happens, and what to look for to see if its works. This allows us to fill in the blanks between learning outcome and instructional content.

Building on the work of Landers, Bedwell and Kahu we will explore ways in which our new consolidated framework of Gamification for Student Engagement may be used in practice.

References:
[1] Bedwell, W.L., Pavlas, D., Heyne, K., Lazzara, E.H., Salas, E. (2012) Toward a Taxonomy Linking Game Attributes to Learning. Simulation & Gaming, 43(6), 729-760. https://doi.org/10.1177/1046878112439444
[2] Deterding, S., Sicart, M., Nacke, L., O’Hara, K., & Dixon, D. (2011). Gamification. using game-design elements in non-gaming contexts. Proceedings of the 2011 Annual Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems - CHI EA ’11, 2425. https://doi.org/10.1145/1979742.1979575
[3] Dicheva, D., Dichev, C., Agre, G., & Angelova, G. (2015). Gamification in Education: A Systematic Mapping Study. Educational Technology & Society, 18(3), 75–88.
[4] Kahu, E. R. (2013). Framing student engagement in higher education. Studies in Higher Education, 38(5), 758–773. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2011.598505
[5] Landers, R. N. (2014). Developing a Theory of Gamified Learning: Linking Serious Games and Gamification of Learning. Simulation & Gaming, 45(6), 752–768. https://doi.org/10.1177/1046878114563660
@InProceedings{GARDEN2018PUT,
author = {Garden, C. and Rivera, E.S.},
title = {PUTTING THEORY INTO PRACTICE: GAMIFICATION FOR STUDENT ENGAGEMENT},
series = {10th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN18 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-09-02709-5},
issn = {2340-1117},
doi = {10.21125/edulearn.2018.1138},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/edulearn.2018.1138},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Palma, Spain},
month = {2-4 July, 2018},
year = {2018},
pages = {4563-4570}}
TY - CONF
AU - C. Garden AU - E.S. Rivera
TI - PUTTING THEORY INTO PRACTICE: GAMIFICATION FOR STUDENT ENGAGEMENT
SN - 978-84-09-02709-5/2340-1117
DO - 10.21125/edulearn.2018.1138
PY - 2018
Y1 - 2-4 July, 2018
CI - Palma, Spain
JO - 10th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN18 Proceedings
SP - 4563
EP - 4570
ER -
C. Garden, E.S. Rivera (2018) PUTTING THEORY INTO PRACTICE: GAMIFICATION FOR STUDENT ENGAGEMENT, EDULEARN18 Proceedings, pp. 4563-4570.
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