About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 6009-6017
Publication year: 2014
ISBN: 978-84-617-2484-0
ISSN: 2340-1095

Conference name: 7th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
Dates: 17-19 November, 2014
Location: Seville, Spain

GENDERED LEADERSHIP STEREOTYPES IN DISADVANTAGED RURAL SCHOOL COMMUNITIES

G. Edwards, J. Perumal

University of Johannesburg (SOUTH AFRICA)
The gender issue in educational leadership has a long historical lineage. With the under representation of women in school leadership positions, the function of the principal is typically associated with stereotypical male leadership traits [1]. This study investigated traditional stereotypical views of leadership and how these might manifest in the leadership of schools in disadvantaged rural communities. Data were collected through a qualitative research paradigm and from a critical feminist perspective. The contextual factors and their influence on preferred leadership style are the main themes that emerged from this study.

Aim of the study:
Considering that the research on educational leadership relates largely to urban, Western contexts, the aim of the study was to determine the extent, if any, that traditional gender stereotypes might manifest in rural, disadvantaged communities in South Africa.

Research methodology:
This was a qualitative research study that was nested within a critical feminist research [2]. Data were gathered by means of semi-structured interviews, focus groups and observations.

Emerging findings:
The initial findings reveal that traditional leadership gender stereotyping is manifested in rural disadvantaged school communities. Of interest, however, is that a number of notable exceptions were discovered. These exceptions presented a leaning towards a feminist approach to leadership and are examples of an androgynous approach to educational leadership.

Significance of the study:
The significance of the study is found in its interrogation of traditional and firmly held beliefs regarding educational leadership in disadvantaged, rural communities. Not only are these beliefs framed in the patriarchal nature of the communities, but there are typically assumed to be correct. The study unlocks and challenges patriarchal and gender stereotypes by citing approaches to educational leadership that are context based and that differ from traditional views.

References:
[1] Wood, T. J. 2003. Gendered Lives Communication, Gender & Culture. California: Wadsworth Publishers.
[2] Skelton, C., Francis, B. and Smulyan. (2006). The SAGE Handbook of Gender and Education. Sage Publications: London.
@InProceedings{EDWARDS2014GEN,
author = {Edwards, G. and Perumal, J.},
title = {GENDERED LEADERSHIP STEREOTYPES IN DISADVANTAGED RURAL SCHOOL COMMUNITIES},
series = {7th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation},
booktitle = {ICERI2014 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-617-2484-0},
issn = {2340-1095},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Seville, Spain},
month = {17-19 November, 2014},
year = {2014},
pages = {6009-6017}}
TY - CONF
AU - G. Edwards AU - J. Perumal
TI - GENDERED LEADERSHIP STEREOTYPES IN DISADVANTAGED RURAL SCHOOL COMMUNITIES
SN - 978-84-617-2484-0/2340-1095
PY - 2014
Y1 - 17-19 November, 2014
CI - Seville, Spain
JO - 7th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
JA - ICERI2014 Proceedings
SP - 6009
EP - 6017
ER -
G. Edwards, J. Perumal (2014) GENDERED LEADERSHIP STEREOTYPES IN DISADVANTAGED RURAL SCHOOL COMMUNITIES, ICERI2014 Proceedings, pp. 6009-6017.
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