About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 3286-3290
Publication year: 2010
ISBN: 978-84-613-9386-2
ISSN: 2340-1117

Conference name: 2nd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 5-7 July, 2010
Location: Barcelona, Spain

THE DIGITAL DIVIDE: EXAMINING TECHNOLOGY IN THE EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTING

E. Dillard, T. Hasbun

Stephen F. Austin State University (UNITED STATES)
Children are increasingly becoming inundated with various forms of technology in their everyday lives, at home and at school (DeBell & Chapman, 2006; Sarama & Clements, 2002). While research has indicated that technology can serve to increase the educational and academic opportunities of children, many teachers who are considered to be proficient or advanced in the use of technology applications, are not utilizing technology to its fullest potential (Bauer & Kenton, 2005). This can be particularly true in an early childhood classroom and is concerning as not all students have equitable access to technology at home (DeBell & Chapman, 2006; Espinosa, Laffey, Whittaker & Sheng, 2006; National Center for Educational Statistics [NCES], 2004). Further research is needed to determine teacher perceptions and attitudes, regarding technology integration.
Statement of the Problem

According to the NCES, 67% of nursery school children and 80% of kindergarten students were reported as having access to computers in 2003 (DeBell & Chapman, 2006). By 2005, the U.S. Department of Education reported that computers were accessible to 86% of the students in Kindergarten classrooms (USDE, 2005). Although there has been a steady increase in classroom access and such early access and usage has been positively correlated to achievement in reading and mathematics, as evidenced in the findings of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, many teachers do not consistently integrate various forms of technology into their daily schedules or into their curriculum (Bauer & Kenton, 2005; DeBell & Chapman, 2006; Espinosa, Laffey, Whittaker & Sheng, 2006; NCES, 2004; Swanson, 2006). The NCES reported that as little as half of all classroom teachers used computers or the internet for instruction with the numbers for early childhood teachers likely being lower (Judson, 2006). This can be particularly problematic for African American and Latino students as it has been noted that they are less likely than their Caucasian peers to have computer and internet access at home (DeBell & Chapman, 2006; Espinosa, Laffey, Whittaker & Sheng, 2006; NCES, 2004). Teachers must begin to address the technology gap that has come to be known as the “digital divide,” and the obvious starting point would be in the early childhood classroom (DeBell & Chapman, 2006; Espinosa, Laffey, Whittaker & Sheng, 2006; NCES, 2004). However, due to pedagogical and practical concerns, there has been resistance with many early childhood educators. If Information Communication Technology (ICT) is to be implemented in developmentally appropriate and meaningful ways with all young learners, arguments for and against ICT must be examined and teacher attitudes and perceptions must be investigated.
@InProceedings{DILLARD2010THE,
author = {Dillard, E. and Hasbun, T.},
title = {THE DIGITAL DIVIDE: EXAMINING TECHNOLOGY IN THE EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTING},
series = {2nd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN10 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-613-9386-2},
issn = {2340-1117},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {5-7 July, 2010},
year = {2010},
pages = {3286-3290}}
TY - CONF
AU - E. Dillard AU - T. Hasbun
TI - THE DIGITAL DIVIDE: EXAMINING TECHNOLOGY IN THE EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTING
SN - 978-84-613-9386-2/2340-1117
PY - 2010
Y1 - 5-7 July, 2010
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 2nd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN10 Proceedings
SP - 3286
EP - 3290
ER -
E. Dillard, T. Hasbun (2010) THE DIGITAL DIVIDE: EXAMINING TECHNOLOGY IN THE EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTING, EDULEARN10 Proceedings, pp. 3286-3290.
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