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Appears in:
Pages: 7062-7071
Publication year: 2013
ISBN: 978-84-616-3847-5
ISSN: 2340-1095

Conference name: 6th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
Dates: 18-20 November, 2013
Location: Seville, Spain

ACCESS AND PARTICIPATION IN AUSTRALIA’S HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY: DECONSTRUCTING AUSTRALIA’S SOCIAL INCLUSION FRAMEWORK

S. Dianati

Flinders University (AUSTRALIA)
Since the start of 1990s in the UK and later in Australia, there has been an undisputed shift in policy in higher education from one of elitism and exclusion to one of mass open access and participation. The higher education sector has seen student numbers grow exponentially over the last few decades, especially those from non-traditional backgrounds; however the social divide between the haves and have nots remains firmly intact (Gidley, J. M. et al. 2010). Despite the fact that there may be greater access through Australia’s recent widening participation model, it does not transcend to empowered success. The social stratification of the market system through institutional hegemony maintains the social divide as much as it maintains the status quo. This is further exacerbated by inefficient determinants of what constitutes socioeconomic status as well as an inadequate underpinning scaling system that has forgotten some low-SES students through its classification system. This is illustrated by the low participation rates of low SES students in Australia’s Go8 universities, indicative of and following suit with The United States Ivory league Universities. From a Bourdieuian perspective, and in relation to social inclusion policy, the interaction of certain fields develops certain social positions in which people are located, often with some individuals struggling for, and not being able to manoeuver through for educational capital. This may suggest that access and quality as neoliberal ideologies need to be revamped, or at least in Australia’s circumstance made more comprehensive to move beyond geographical location as the only basis of class, capital and status. The juxtaposition lies with Australia’s over-emphasis on international performance comparisons; while simultaneously having an under-developed social inclusion framework lacking the ability to even be internationally compared. This paper deconstructs current theories of social inclusion and exclusion from historical and neoliberal perspectives and provides alternatives to current university led social inclusion programs.
@InProceedings{DIANATI2013ACC,
author = {Dianati, S.},
title = {ACCESS AND PARTICIPATION IN AUSTRALIA’S HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY: DECONSTRUCTING AUSTRALIA’S SOCIAL INCLUSION FRAMEWORK},
series = {6th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation},
booktitle = {ICERI2013 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-616-3847-5},
issn = {2340-1095},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Seville, Spain},
month = {18-20 November, 2013},
year = {2013},
pages = {7062-7071}}
TY - CONF
AU - S. Dianati
TI - ACCESS AND PARTICIPATION IN AUSTRALIA’S HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY: DECONSTRUCTING AUSTRALIA’S SOCIAL INCLUSION FRAMEWORK
SN - 978-84-616-3847-5/2340-1095
PY - 2013
Y1 - 18-20 November, 2013
CI - Seville, Spain
JO - 6th International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation
JA - ICERI2013 Proceedings
SP - 7062
EP - 7071
ER -
S. Dianati (2013) ACCESS AND PARTICIPATION IN AUSTRALIA’S HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY: DECONSTRUCTING AUSTRALIA’S SOCIAL INCLUSION FRAMEWORK, ICERI2013 Proceedings, pp. 7062-7071.
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