About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 6309-6316
Publication year: 2010
ISBN: 978-84-613-9386-2
ISSN: 2340-1117

Conference name: 2nd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 5-7 July, 2010
Location: Barcelona, Spain

HOW NOT TO TEACH RESEARCH METHODOLOGY TO MBA STUDENTS IN SOUTH AFRICA

T. Carmichael, G. Bick

University of the Witwatersrand (SOUTH AFRICA)
Research and the submission of a Research Report is a compulsory component of MBA degrees in South Africa. Local legislation requires that the percentage contribution to the final mark for the degree be no less than 33.3% (with pressure to raise the contribution to 50%), so preparation and execution of this weighty project is critical to successful completion of the qualification.

This research describes the mistakes made and lessons learned in attempting to bridge the gap between theory and practice, and discover the best formula for teaching the principles of academic research to mature, post-experience, practising managers undertaking a professional, pragmatic Master’s level qualification.

Over the three year period in which the interventions were implemented, evaluated and modified, a total of seven Research Methodology courses were conducted, involving around 350 students. Data were collected through written and verbal peer and student feedback, course evaluations using the models of Kirkpatrick and Phillips, lecturer evaluations and throughput statistics.

The interventions took on an almost recursive quality and touched most of the principles of adult education. Progressive modifications were made to curriculum design, course structure, focus and content, pedagogical issues, assessment criteria and methodologies (including triangulated assessments), quality standards, ethics issues and the nature of suitable MBA research, which included identifying an acceptable level of action and / or consulting-type research as opposed to more traditional academic research.

Other emergent issues underpinning the success of the methodology course were consideration of the assumptions that could be made about the existing knowledge and skills of the MBA students, and identification of the competencies required to undertake such a research project, such as critical evaluation of the literature and interviewing skills.

Although a “perfect” approach remains elusive, the most recent iteration of the course is presented as a proposed model for comment and critique.
@InProceedings{CARMICHAEL2010HOW,
author = {Carmichael, T. and Bick, G.},
title = {HOW NOT TO TEACH RESEARCH METHODOLOGY TO MBA STUDENTS IN SOUTH AFRICA},
series = {2nd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN10 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-613-9386-2},
issn = {2340-1117},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {5-7 July, 2010},
year = {2010},
pages = {6309-6316}}
TY - CONF
AU - T. Carmichael AU - G. Bick
TI - HOW NOT TO TEACH RESEARCH METHODOLOGY TO MBA STUDENTS IN SOUTH AFRICA
SN - 978-84-613-9386-2/2340-1117
PY - 2010
Y1 - 5-7 July, 2010
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 2nd International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN10 Proceedings
SP - 6309
EP - 6316
ER -
T. Carmichael, G. Bick (2010) HOW NOT TO TEACH RESEARCH METHODOLOGY TO MBA STUDENTS IN SOUTH AFRICA, EDULEARN10 Proceedings, pp. 6309-6316.
User:
Pass: