About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 3005-3015
Publication year: 2017
ISBN: 978-84-697-3777-4
ISSN: 2340-1117
doi: 10.21125/edulearn.2017.1630

Conference name: 9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 3-5 July, 2017
Location: Barcelona, Spain

THE USE OF VIRTUAL REALITY IN EDUCATION AND LEARNING: A CASE STUDY FOR TEACHING CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION

A. Cardwell, J. Murray, R. Croxton, B. Nurse

University of Lincoln (UNITED KINGDOM)
The University of Lincoln's School of Chemistry delivers a Forensic Science module in Crime Scene Investigation (CSI). This is delivered via lectures and lab sessions, which lead into practical assessments carried out in a Crime Scene House, where a mock crime scene setup has been created for students. Due to large numbers of students on the module and limited availability of the Crime Scene House, coupled with the large costs associated with setting up and configuring crime scenes, a strain on resources can be put on staff, such as available time and opportunities for students to access the house.

These limitations can result in students not receiving as much practise time as the programme team might prefer. Additionally, the setup is limited by the types of crimes that can be re-created. For example, blood stains cannot be mocked up and time must be reserved for ‘clean up’. To address these limitations, we propose the use of a Virtual Reality (VR) Crime Scene Investigation simulator.

Virtual Reality with its photo realistic and immersive qualities can provide students with an environment where skills can be honed and developed without real-world restrictions, consequences or limitations. VR is an ideal technology to be used in teaching subjects that are inherently difficult to deliver in a classroom based environment. In the case study presented in this paper, we use the HTC Vive VR system; this technology allows users’ movements to be tracked, accurately and responsively; allowing the recreation of practical activities in a virtual environment without the constrains imposed by physical constructs. The system presented in this paper demonstrates how requirements and workload for lecturers can be greatly reduced as configuration of the crime scene can be done via software rather than setting up a physical house.

This paper presents a system designed to teach students Crime Scene Investigation techniques and processes using Virtual Reality technology. The goal is to provide a platform that gives students the ability to engage in practical CSI learning, in a rich and stimulating environment, similar to what would be experienced in practical workshops traditional lessons.

Students are asked to complete a realistic crime scene scenario based on a real crime. Upon entering the virtual scene, they undergo full CSI procedures taught during lectures. The application of these techniques within VR helps to promote a greater understanding of the taught materials.

The availability of this system compared to traditional training methods allows for individual quality feedback to be given to students. The lecturer can view from the users’ perspective, easily engaging and questioning their actions, giving hints and reinforcing techniques. As such ‘live’ feedback can be given by the system itself and/or a lecturer and forms a critical part of the students learning process.

The nature of the system is to give students access to a realistic simulation allowing them to practice CSI techniques and reinforce their classroom based learning, before the practical hands-on assessment. Students are marked when completing the virtual scene and assessed based on the CSI module marking criteria.

Initial findings have shown that students find the simulation both immersive and beneficial to their learning experience as it allows them to put into practice learnt skills and techniques and receive feedback and support to enable development and further learning.
@InProceedings{CARDWELL2017USE,
author = {Cardwell, A. and Murray, J. and Croxton, R. and Nurse, B.},
title = {THE USE OF VIRTUAL REALITY IN EDUCATION AND LEARNING: A CASE STUDY FOR TEACHING CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION},
series = {9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN17 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-697-3777-4},
issn = {2340-1117},
doi = {10.21125/edulearn.2017.1630},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/edulearn.2017.1630},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {3-5 July, 2017},
year = {2017},
pages = {3005-3015}}
TY - CONF
AU - A. Cardwell AU - J. Murray AU - R. Croxton AU - B. Nurse
TI - THE USE OF VIRTUAL REALITY IN EDUCATION AND LEARNING: A CASE STUDY FOR TEACHING CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION
SN - 978-84-697-3777-4/2340-1117
DO - 10.21125/edulearn.2017.1630
PY - 2017
Y1 - 3-5 July, 2017
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN17 Proceedings
SP - 3005
EP - 3015
ER -
A. Cardwell, J. Murray, R. Croxton, B. Nurse (2017) THE USE OF VIRTUAL REALITY IN EDUCATION AND LEARNING: A CASE STUDY FOR TEACHING CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION, EDULEARN17 Proceedings, pp. 3005-3015.
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