FILM PRODUCTION TEACHING METHODOLOGIES FOR THE DEAF: THE PALHOÇA BILINGUAL CAMPUS EXPERIENCE

F. Bubniak, L. Moraes, B.P. Velloso, D. Scandolara, S. Figueiredo

Federal Institute of Santa Catarina (BRAZIL)
The main act of resistance to the imposition of oralism and the signing prohibition in deaf education is the preservation of sign language. Cinema brought to the deaf the possibility of registering sign language at a time when oralism prevailed and signing was prohibited. Since the advent of sound in the cinema, it has become vococentric, that is, privileges the voice in relation to other sounds. This characteristic is a mirror of habitual human behavior. A deaf cinema, therefore, would be a cinema not centered on voice. One of the main deaf gains would be "the unique sensory orientation of the deaf" (DAVIS, 2013) focused on visuality. This gives the deaf a natural propensity for visual arts, among them, cinema. Film and video production education in schools is fundamental for the deaf to express themselves socially in a visual language. This paper describes the experience developed in a Video class with a group of deaf students at Palhoça Bilingual campus of IFSC. All the steps of film production were thought taking into account the visuality and the linguistic characteristics of the deaf students, from the script, to the production itself and the editing.
keywords: film, education, deaf.