About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 4393-4397
Publication year: 2010
ISBN: 978-84-613-5538-9
ISSN: 2340-1079

Conference name: 4th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
Dates: 8-10 March, 2010
Location: Valencia, Spain

HUMAN RIGHTS AS A BASIS FOR INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

N.J. Bothne

Adler School of Professional Psychology (UNITED STATES)
This poster will examine a human rights basis for community engagement and service learning in higher education. It will examine and explain what international human rights are, and how human rights offer a foundation of values and standards. Models of community engagement and service learning will also be explained. The poster will then provide examples of international community engagement/service learning projects that utilize the human rights lens. Examples will be drawn from cross-cultural, international projects. The poster will conclude with an evaluation of the usefulness of human rights framing.

The international human rights framework has as its basis the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). The UDHR is the most accepted statement of values in the world (Weisbrodt, 1988). The UDHR was adopted by the United Nations in 1948. It defines human rights as what is essential to recognize the “inherent human dignity” of all members of the “human family.” It articulates economic, social, cultural, political and civil rights. Political and civil rights include, for example, the right to a nationality; to peacefully assemble; and to recognition everywhere as a person before the law. Economic, social and cultural rights include the right to a standard of living adequate for the well-being of a person and family; a right to education; and a right to work as well as to rest and leisure.

The international human rights framework defines human rights beyond those defined in the U.S. Constitution. Grassroots activists familiar with international human rights have additional tools to advocate for issues such as the right to housing. Models of human rights activism from around the globe thus provide inspiration and learned lessons for U.S. activists.

Community engagement and service learning are manifestations of experiential education where students provide work or service for a community-based entity. Not all community engagement work is driven by social justice and human rights. When human rights provide a basis for community engagement, however, students gain skills and tools for evaluating systemic interventions. Human rights also facilitate community partners’ needs as ecologically based. Community engagement becomes a partnership rather than charity work.

Two to three community engagement projects will be examined to identify the advantages of grounding students in a human rights framework. These U.S.-based projects are examples of cross cultural, international community engagement. Using the human rights framework and goals of community engagement through experiential education, the projects will be evaluated.

Reference: Weisbrodt, D. & O’Toole, T. (1988). The development of international human rights law. Amnesty International – USA Legal Support Network. Amnesty International.
@InProceedings{BOTHNE2010HUM,
author = {Bothne, N.J.},
title = {HUMAN RIGHTS AS A BASIS FOR INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT},
series = {4th International Technology, Education and Development Conference},
booktitle = {INTED2010 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-613-5538-9},
issn = {2340-1079},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Valencia, Spain},
month = {8-10 March, 2010},
year = {2010},
pages = {4393-4397}}
TY - CONF
AU - N.J. Bothne
TI - HUMAN RIGHTS AS A BASIS FOR INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
SN - 978-84-613-5538-9/2340-1079
PY - 2010
Y1 - 8-10 March, 2010
CI - Valencia, Spain
JO - 4th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
JA - INTED2010 Proceedings
SP - 4393
EP - 4397
ER -
N.J. Bothne (2010) HUMAN RIGHTS AS A BASIS FOR INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT, INTED2010 Proceedings, pp. 4393-4397.
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