About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 8037-8047
Publication year: 2018
ISBN: 978-84-697-9480-7
ISSN: 2340-1079
doi: 10.21125/inted.2018.1940

Conference name: 12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
Dates: 5-7 March, 2018
Location: Valencia, Spain

TIKONDWE TEACHERS PROJECT IN DOMASI, MALAWI: PARTNERING TO BUILD INSTITUTIONAL AND TEACHER CAPACITY, AND FOSTER LEADERSHIP FOR SUSTAINABLE CHANGE

E.A. Barber1, A. Potts1, J. Snyder2, J. Zinner1, A. Ussi3, L. Kapenuka4, C. Ziyaya5, T. Kapenuka6, R. Stovala5, J. Pwetekwele7, J. Stephens1, E. Parker1, C. Kenney8, T. McCoy1, E. Helbling1, M. Daria1, M.K. Corbisiero1

1University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNITED STATES)
2Alamance Community College (UNITED STATES)
3Mchingawedi Zonal Supervisor, Malawi Ministry of Education (MALAWI)
4Malemia Primary School (MALAWI)
5Domasi Demonstration Primary School (MALAWI)
6Namadidi Day Secondary School (MALAWI)
7Domasi Government Primary School (MALAWI)
8Brunswick County Public Schools (UNITED STATES)
Since 2004 students and faculty from the U.S. have worked for a month each year with teachers in 3 rural schools Domasi, Malawi, to seed sustainable change projects that hold potential to save lives and educate children and youth. Partners worried about learner outcomes in the country’s public education initiative, begun in 1994. Educational opportunity promise, but many factors mitigated against attending and persisting in school. A continuing struggle with poverty and establishing functional government, caused these factors to persist. In a farming economy, the need for child workers and cost of school fees sharply restrict access to education. A shortage of schools and teachers prevails, class size can be 140+. Teachers have scant preparation and lack in-service development opportunities. School reading and writing materials are nearly non-existent, must be shared across many learners or used by the teacher only. Hunger keeps children from attending, and older girls can miss a week of school each month. Language diversity constitutes yet another barrier. School is conducted in Chichewa, with English taught as a second language. Non-speakers of ChiChewa are unable to understand the language of instruction, and lack a bridge to English, the language of instruction in Standard 5 onward, and of the Standard 8 exam which structures access to secondary school.

In Malawi, literacy is linked to staying alive. According the Malawi Population-Based HIV Impact Assessment for 2015-2016, 10.6% of the population ages 15 and above test positive for HIV/AIDS. Prevalence varies geographically, ranging from 5.3 percent in the Central East to 18.2 percent in Blantyre City, close to where our work is located. Most importantly, however, the rates of HIV/AIDS infection in Malawi decrease with the level of education (Kadzamira, Banda, Kamlongera & Swainson, 2001).

In 2004, a typical Standard 1 class held 125 children, but by Standard 8, class size had shrunk to 65. In 2017, after 13 years of projects targeted at reasons for school-leaving, 94 learners sat for the Standard 8 exam. In 2004, of the 65 Standard 8 learners, only 3 scored high to attend secondary; by 2010 this number reached 40, and although it fluctuates with variations in school leaders and the experience of teachers, it continues to swell over time. Rates of selection to secondary lag, however, because there are not enough secondary schools. Among our youth and teacher colleagues in Domasi, numbers have attended secondary and college, forming a slowly developing working class: teachers, nurses, business-owners, accountants, news reporters, and government employees, among other professions.

Making school effective and accessible saves lives, and drastically alters life chances. It is also clear that trans-global partnerships that support change agents on the ground can powerfully impact educational change. Our paper details successful projects to date, but its major focus is on developing strategies for sustainability. Working from our current point of knowledge, how do we move forward to fully hand over maintenance and generativity of projects to survive across time, politics, and institutional flux? How do we build institutional and teacher capacity, and teacher leadership, in ways that fully turn ownership over to our colleagues in Domasi?
@InProceedings{BARBER2018TIK,
author = {Barber, E.A. and Potts, A. and Snyder, J. and Zinner, J. and Ussi, A. and Kapenuka, L. and Ziyaya, C. and Kapenuka, T. and Stovala, R. and Pwetekwele, J. and Stephens, J. and Parker, E. and Kenney, C. and McCoy, T. and Helbling, E. and Daria, M. and Corbisiero, M.K.},
title = {TIKONDWE TEACHERS PROJECT IN DOMASI, MALAWI: PARTNERING TO BUILD INSTITUTIONAL AND TEACHER CAPACITY, AND FOSTER LEADERSHIP FOR SUSTAINABLE CHANGE},
series = {12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference},
booktitle = {INTED2018 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-697-9480-7},
issn = {2340-1079},
doi = {10.21125/inted.2018.1940},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/inted.2018.1940},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Valencia, Spain},
month = {5-7 March, 2018},
year = {2018},
pages = {8037-8047}}
TY - CONF
AU - E.A. Barber AU - A. Potts AU - J. Snyder AU - J. Zinner AU - A. Ussi AU - L. Kapenuka AU - C. Ziyaya AU - T. Kapenuka AU - R. Stovala AU - J. Pwetekwele AU - J. Stephens AU - E. Parker AU - C. Kenney AU - T. McCoy AU - E. Helbling AU - M. Daria AU - M.K. Corbisiero
TI - TIKONDWE TEACHERS PROJECT IN DOMASI, MALAWI: PARTNERING TO BUILD INSTITUTIONAL AND TEACHER CAPACITY, AND FOSTER LEADERSHIP FOR SUSTAINABLE CHANGE
SN - 978-84-697-9480-7/2340-1079
DO - 10.21125/inted.2018.1940
PY - 2018
Y1 - 5-7 March, 2018
CI - Valencia, Spain
JO - 12th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
JA - INTED2018 Proceedings
SP - 8037
EP - 8047
ER -
E.A. Barber, A. Potts, J. Snyder, J. Zinner, A. Ussi, L. Kapenuka, C. Ziyaya, T. Kapenuka, R. Stovala, J. Pwetekwele, J. Stephens, E. Parker, C. Kenney, T. McCoy, E. Helbling, M. Daria, M.K. Corbisiero (2018) TIKONDWE TEACHERS PROJECT IN DOMASI, MALAWI: PARTNERING TO BUILD INSTITUTIONAL AND TEACHER CAPACITY, AND FOSTER LEADERSHIP FOR SUSTAINABLE CHANGE, INTED2018 Proceedings, pp. 8037-8047.
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