About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 3803-3812
Publication year: 2011
ISBN: 978-84-614-7423-3
ISSN: 2340-1079

Conference name: 5th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
Dates: 7-9 March, 2011
Location: Valencia, Spain

BENEFITS OF USING SYSTEMS ENGINEERING METHODS, TECHNIQUES, AND TOOLS IN COLLABORATIVE, MULTIDISCIPLINARY, EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS: A NASA, UNIVERSITY, AND K-12 CUBESAT EXAMPLE

W. Arrasmith, S. Bucaille

Florida Institute of Technology (UNITED STATES)
Systems engineering (SE) methods, techniques and tools have been successfully used to develop and implement complex, multidisciplinary, long lasting projects and programs that use diversified skills and that span organizations and in many cases even countries. Some examples include the requirement to include systems engineering methodologies in major acquisition programs in the U.S. Department of Defense (and its allies) and NASA. The purpose of this paper is to show that the systems engineering methodology that is the mainstay in large, governmental, acquisition programs in the United States and elsewhere, works equally well for smaller programs such as multidisciplinary science, engineering, and technology experiments/projects/programs at educational institutions. Adopting systems engineering methods in educational technology endeavors permits and facilitates; implementing projects that span semesters and even academic years; involving multiple departments within the university, other universities, industry, and other organizations; incorporating different funding streams; and readily handling turnover in students and faculty. To illustrate how this is achieved, we will present a feasibility study of a pending collaboration between NASA, a university, and a high school to develop a CubeSat experiment using system engineering methods.
CubeSats are a relatively recent and new type of satellite. These “picosats” have smaller life expectancies than long-term (5+ year life expectancy) satellites. CubeSats are comparatively cheap, small (10x10x10 cm), and are very flexible and versatile. Universities all over the world are using CubeSats to conduct various experiments in space at a significantly reduced cost and without the need for a large experimental space-based platform and support infrastructure. As the picosatellite model continues to gain popularity and asserts its presence in the satellite build and launch industry, it is expected that more governmental, educational, and commercial interests will emerge.
NASA has an interest to properly set safety requirements associated with CubeSat experiments. Up to three CubeSats can be housed in a Poly-Picosat Orbital Deployer (P-POD) and the P-POD itself is mounted to a rocket with a primary payload. In actuality, the CubeSat is “hitching a ride” into space through the P-POD and the predominant expense of getting into space is born by the primary payload. In all cases, the primary payload must not be adversely affected by the presence of the P-POD and CubeSat experiments. NASA is interested in obtaining launch environment data to include temperature data, wired and wireless 3-axis accelerometer data, and video data of significant launch, assent and delivery events. This data will be used to establish proper safety margins for CubeSat experiments in general. In conducting this experiment and gathering the appropriate data, NASA desires collaboration between NASA, a university, and a K-12 educational element (e.g. high school). The idea is to jointly develop an experiment to accomplish the NASA goals using a 2-unit CubeSat developed at the university, and a 1-unit CubeSat developed at a high school. This paper presents the results of a systems engineering oriented feasibility study for conducting such an experiment and illustrates how the systems engineering methodology would benefit the governmental, industrial, and educational collaborative partnership.
@InProceedings{ARRASMITH2011BEN,
author = {Arrasmith, W. and Bucaille, S.},
title = {BENEFITS OF USING SYSTEMS ENGINEERING METHODS, TECHNIQUES, AND TOOLS IN COLLABORATIVE, MULTIDISCIPLINARY, EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS: A NASA, UNIVERSITY, AND K-12 CUBESAT EXAMPLE},
series = {5th International Technology, Education and Development Conference},
booktitle = {INTED2011 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-614-7423-3},
issn = {2340-1079},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Valencia, Spain},
month = {7-9 March, 2011},
year = {2011},
pages = {3803-3812}}
TY - CONF
AU - W. Arrasmith AU - S. Bucaille
TI - BENEFITS OF USING SYSTEMS ENGINEERING METHODS, TECHNIQUES, AND TOOLS IN COLLABORATIVE, MULTIDISCIPLINARY, EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS: A NASA, UNIVERSITY, AND K-12 CUBESAT EXAMPLE
SN - 978-84-614-7423-3/2340-1079
PY - 2011
Y1 - 7-9 March, 2011
CI - Valencia, Spain
JO - 5th International Technology, Education and Development Conference
JA - INTED2011 Proceedings
SP - 3803
EP - 3812
ER -
W. Arrasmith, S. Bucaille (2011) BENEFITS OF USING SYSTEMS ENGINEERING METHODS, TECHNIQUES, AND TOOLS IN COLLABORATIVE, MULTIDISCIPLINARY, EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS: A NASA, UNIVERSITY, AND K-12 CUBESAT EXAMPLE, INTED2011 Proceedings, pp. 3803-3812.
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