About this paper

Appears in:
Page: 6462 (abstract only)
Publication year: 2015
ISBN: 978-84-606-8243-1
ISSN: 2340-1117

Conference name: 7th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 6-8 July, 2015
Location: Barcelona, Spain

PSYCHOLOGICAL SAFETY IN HIGH FIDELITY SIMULATION: A WALKER & AVANT CONCEPT ANALYSIS

C. Anyinam, C. Da Silva

George Brown College (CANADA)
Aim:
This presentation will apply Walker & Avant’s (1995) nine-step approach to the concept of “psychological safety” in high fidelity simulation in healthcare education.

Background:
The use of high fidelity simulations is associated with patient safety, but what about the safety of the learner(s)? Research studies highlight the importance of creating a psychological safe climate for learners in order that they be comfortable in participating in the simulation (Ganley & Linnard-Palmer, 2012; Neill, Cert & Wottton, 2011; Wickers, 2010). However, a basic conceptual understanding of what this concept represents, such as its attributes, antecedents and consequences is not clear. A universal definition for psychological safety in the high fidelity simulation domain is missing from the published literature.

Method:
Walker & Avant’s (1995) step-wise approach will be used to guide this concept analysis. Literature searches regarding psychological safety in high fidelity simulation will be used such as, bibliographic databases (Medline, CINAHL, Web of Science, Proquest), internet search engines (Google Scholar), and hand searches.

Findings:
Based on the conceptual analysis undertaken, a psychological safety concept that applies to learners participating in high fidelity simulations will be proposed.

Conclusion:
Concept analysis has an important role to play in the development of the simulation education literature. Presently, a common understanding of what psychological safety represents for the learner is not well understood. A common understanding of the concept will improve the clarity and validity of future research studies and will ultimately prevent conceptual disarray.

References:
[1] Ganley B. J., & Linnard-Plamer, L. (2012). Academic safety during nursing simulation: Perceptions of nursing students and faculty. Clinical Simulation in Nursing 8, 49-57.
[2] Neill M. A., & Wotton, K. (2011). High-fidelity simulation debriefing in nursing education: A literature review. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 7, 161-168.
[3] Walker L. O., & Avant, K. C. (1995). Strategies for theory construction in nursing, 3rd ed. Appleton & Lange, Norwalk, CT.
[4] Wickers, M. P. (2010). Establishing the climate for a successful debriefing. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 6, 83-86.
@InProceedings{ANYINAM2015PSY,
author = {Anyinam, C. and Da Silva, C.},
title = {PSYCHOLOGICAL SAFETY IN HIGH FIDELITY SIMULATION: A WALKER & AVANT CONCEPT ANALYSIS},
series = {7th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN15 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-606-8243-1},
issn = {2340-1117},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {6-8 July, 2015},
year = {2015},
pages = {6462}}
TY - CONF
AU - C. Anyinam AU - C. Da Silva
TI - PSYCHOLOGICAL SAFETY IN HIGH FIDELITY SIMULATION: A WALKER & AVANT CONCEPT ANALYSIS
SN - 978-84-606-8243-1/2340-1117
PY - 2015
Y1 - 6-8 July, 2015
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 7th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN15 Proceedings
SP - 6462
EP - 6462
ER -
C. Anyinam, C. Da Silva (2015) PSYCHOLOGICAL SAFETY IN HIGH FIDELITY SIMULATION: A WALKER & AVANT CONCEPT ANALYSIS, EDULEARN15 Proceedings, p. 6462.
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