TEACHER PREPARATION ... JUST A CLICK AWAY! USING STUDENT RESPONSE SYSTEMS IN EDUCATOR PREPARATION PROGRAMS

M. Allen, T. Dorel

Texas A&M University-San Antonio (UNITED STATES)
Objective of the presentation:
This presentation looks specifically at the preparation for teacher certification exams while utilizing the student response system integrating potential questions within curricular instructional strategies. Specific objectives for the paper presentation include learning about the use of “clickers” (i.e., student response systems) to increase student engagement in post-secondary undergraduate and graduate education classrooms while preparing them for successful certification exam expectations.

Relationship to conference themes:
This presentation supports “Technology-Enhanced Learning” as a university works towards increasing success of pre-service teachers on certification exams while faculty role model the use of technology readily available on elementary and secondary campuses. Additionally, skills students learn during the use of student response systems in college classrooms transfer directly to increased technology integration in curricular strategies. Research conducted by two faculty members on student perceptions regarding the use of "clickers" in post-secondary classrooms further supports “Research on Technology in Education”.

Abstract:
Students, particularly those that are non-traditional and first time in college students, often are intimidated in the university classroom regarding elicited responses. Too often, a limited number of students participate in classroom discussion, leaving the rest of the students to learn vicariously. A student response system allows for anonymity of responses while also allowing the faculty member to analyze material being presented for understanding. Used widely in sciences and mathematics preparation, limited research has been conducted regarding student response systems (i.e., "clickers") being used in educator preparation programs.

This presentation looks specifically at the preparation for teacher certification exams while utilizing the student response system integrating potential questions within curricular instructional strategies. Questions are posed, and responses are collected. Dialogue regarding the rationale of answers is then embarked upon connecting learned concepts with professional experiences and scenarios increasing relevancy, student engagement, and professor role modeling of effective teaching practices. Initial quantitative and qualitative results from three semesters of use will be presented along with “lessons learned” and future recommendations.