About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 7618-7626
Publication year: 2014
ISBN: 978-84-617-0557-3
ISSN: 2340-1117

Conference name: 6th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 7-9 July, 2014
Location: Barcelona, Spain

A TIME AND A PLACE TO LEARN: CAN LEARNING CONTINUE IN VIRTUAL REALITY LONG AFTER TRADITIONAL DELIVERIES HAVE EXHAUSTED STUDENTS MINDS?

A. Addison, W. O'Hare, A. Kerry

Teesside University (UNITED KINGDOM)
This paper examines the relationship between ‘time on task’ and e-learning by seeking to apply “time on task” principles to the learning opportunities provided in virtual environments for students. Since 1963 the factor of time as a meaningful variable in learning has been the subject of a number of studies and models. The ‘time on task’ principle having been established as a variable is dependent upon the commitment the student gives to their learning and the chances the student has to engage in learning. It has been observed that as there is no way to measure what is actually going on inside the learners’ heads then time itself only matters in so much as the attention of the student is maintained over the time it takes to learn. The proportion of time in focus then becomes the time that the student is actively engaged in learning. The task then converts to one of how to produce consistent engagement by the learner and how to provide sufficient time for them to learn.

The motivation to learn and uninterrupted flow of learning once it commences are key factors in engagement. The flow of learning is vulnerable to both external and internal influences. Noise as an external influence is often a difficulty encountered in face to face learning, whilst the fear of failure may be an internal influence that blocks the student from enjoying a free flow of learning. The ability to manage these influences may enable the learner, producing the required engagement over a prolonged period of time.

Applying these ideas to the current diversity of e-learning options it appears that new technologies may represent an opportunity to engage in active learning over a longer period of time than many of the traditional face to face deliveries. Students have indicated that when using virtual reality within modules for learning they are unaware of the passage of time. Lecturers have experienced students remaining on task far longer during virtual reality learning activities. Using thermography imaging students were filmed undertaking class-room tuition; lab-based activities and a virtual reality activity and the data examined to define any patterns which could conclude that engagement with learning was protracted throughout any of the tuition activities.
@InProceedings{ADDISON2014ATI,
author = {Addison, A. and O'Hare, W. and Kerry, A.},
title = {A TIME AND A PLACE TO LEARN: CAN LEARNING CONTINUE IN VIRTUAL REALITY LONG AFTER TRADITIONAL DELIVERIES HAVE EXHAUSTED STUDENTS MINDS?},
series = {6th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN14 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-617-0557-3},
issn = {2340-1117},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {7-9 July, 2014},
year = {2014},
pages = {7618-7626}}
TY - CONF
AU - A. Addison AU - W. O'Hare AU - A. Kerry
TI - A TIME AND A PLACE TO LEARN: CAN LEARNING CONTINUE IN VIRTUAL REALITY LONG AFTER TRADITIONAL DELIVERIES HAVE EXHAUSTED STUDENTS MINDS?
SN - 978-84-617-0557-3/2340-1117
PY - 2014
Y1 - 7-9 July, 2014
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 6th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN14 Proceedings
SP - 7618
EP - 7626
ER -
A. Addison, W. O'Hare, A. Kerry (2014) A TIME AND A PLACE TO LEARN: CAN LEARNING CONTINUE IN VIRTUAL REALITY LONG AFTER TRADITIONAL DELIVERIES HAVE EXHAUSTED STUDENTS MINDS?, EDULEARN14 Proceedings, pp. 7618-7626.
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