About this paper

Appears in:
Pages: 356-364
Publication year: 2017
ISBN: 978-84-697-3777-4
ISSN: 2340-1117
doi: 10.21125/edulearn.2017.1081

Conference name: 9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
Dates: 3-5 July, 2017
Location: Barcelona, Spain

SO, STUDENTS HAVE BEEN GIVEN FEEDBACK, NOW WHAT?

T.M. Thorseth1, M.S. Kahrs2

1Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (NORWAY)
2Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NORWAY)
Formative assessments or “assessments for learning” are challenging to perform in higher education, given the lecture form and the number of students present. We have developed and tested an assessment procedure where large student groups were given a two-hour assessment with immediate feedback, six times throughout one semester. However, the consequences of this immediate feedback are largely unknown, beyond making the students realise any misconceptions towards the specific assessment items. Ideally, formative feedback should provide each student with information on how to proceed, both with regards to content matter and to their own learning strategies. Our statistical analysis suggests that we are far from reaching this goal.

We have followed 109 students through the first introductory mathematics course at the bachelor engineering education at NTNU. By using an in-class assessment procedure, we gave students regular feedback on their progress throughout the course. In addition to working on and responding to questions during the class assessments, the students reported an expectancy measure before each assessment and reported the degree of satisfaction after each assessment session. The students also reported the hours of effort spent on the subject the last week before the assessment. They were also challenged to reflect over their own individual learning process.

The six assessments, as we have performed them in class, predict only 55% of the final exam results. Measurements of effort does not correlate with the result from each assessment. However, we see a weak but significant correlation for the sum of self-reported effort with the results from the final exam,.232 significant at a 0.05 level.

We conclude that good assessments are not enough if we don’t provide information about how to improve learning strategies. Both learning of the subject and acquiring new strategies for learning takes time to master and hence require continued effort from both students and academic staff beyond a single semester.
@InProceedings{THORSETH2017SO,,
author = {Thorseth, T.M. and Kahrs, M.S.},
title = {SO, STUDENTS HAVE BEEN GIVEN FEEDBACK, NOW WHAT?},
series = {9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies},
booktitle = {EDULEARN17 Proceedings},
isbn = {978-84-697-3777-4},
issn = {2340-1117},
doi = {10.21125/edulearn.2017.1081},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21125/edulearn.2017.1081},
publisher = {IATED},
location = {Barcelona, Spain},
month = {3-5 July, 2017},
year = {2017},
pages = {356-364}}
TY - CONF
AU - T.M. Thorseth AU - M.S. Kahrs
TI - SO, STUDENTS HAVE BEEN GIVEN FEEDBACK, NOW WHAT?
SN - 978-84-697-3777-4/2340-1117
DO - 10.21125/edulearn.2017.1081
PY - 2017
Y1 - 3-5 July, 2017
CI - Barcelona, Spain
JO - 9th International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies
JA - EDULEARN17 Proceedings
SP - 356
EP - 364
ER -
T.M. Thorseth, M.S. Kahrs (2017) SO, STUDENTS HAVE BEEN GIVEN FEEDBACK, NOW WHAT?, EDULEARN17 Proceedings, pp. 356-364.
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